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Two girls operate the Giant Joystick at LABoral Art and Industrial Creation Centre, March 31, 2007 in Asturias, Spain. The giant video game controller made of wood, rubber and steel by a Dartmouth College professor Mary Flanagan has made it into the Guinness World Records 2022 as the largest joystick. Mary Flanagan/AP hide caption

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Mary Flanagan/AP

Ted Dabney (far left) stands in front of a Pong arcade machine in 1973 with (left to right) co-founder Nolan Bushnell, head of finance Fred Marincic and the man credited with the idea for Pong, Allan Alcorn. Allan Alcorn/Computer History Museum hide caption

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Allan Alcorn/Computer History Museum
Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: The World's Worst Video Game

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An E.T. doll was held up at the site of an exploratory dig for old Atari video games Saturday. Workers dug into a landfill in Alamogordo, N.M., that had long been rumored to be the final resting place of millions of copies of the game E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. Juan Carlos Llorca/AP hide caption

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Juan Carlos Llorca/AP

The "Atari Dump" of New Mexico, where the game company rid itself of unsold game cartridges, will be excavated this summer. Here, a file photo shows a woman demonstrating Atari's unreleased 1984 Mindlink device, using a headband that picks up impulses from movement of the player's forehead. Charlie Knoblock/AP hide caption

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Charlie Knoblock/AP