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For Furloughed Worker, Isolation, Hit To Self-Worth Hurt As Much As Lost Pay

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People wait in line at Chef Jose Andres' World Central Kitchen for free meals to workers affected by the government shutdown in Washington, DC. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Opinion: Volunteers Step Up To Care For Furloughed Federal Workers

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The US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 14, 2019, is seen following a snowstorm. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

'Barely Treading Water': Why The Shutdown Disproportionately Affects Black Americans

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Federal workers wait for food distribution to begin Saturday at a pop-up food bank in Rockville, Md. The Capital Area Food Bank is distributing free food to government employees during the shutdown. Ian Stewart/NPR hide caption

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Ian Stewart/NPR

Federal Workers Struggle To Stretch Their Money As Shutdown Lingers

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Volunteers hand out food to furloughed workers and their family at a community potluck. Courtesy of Dave Asche hide caption

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Courtesy of Dave Asche

Furloughed Workers In Hard-Hit Community Gather For Potluck During Shutdown

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Furloughed federal workers protest the ongoing, partial shutdown of the federal government during a non-partisan rally Tuesday at Independence Mall, in Philadelphia. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto/Getty Images

IRS employee Pam Crosbie and others hold signs protesting the government shutdown at a federal building in Ogden, Utah. Natalie Behring/Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Getty Images

As of Wednesday, you won't be able to ride this bald eagle at the carousel at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, D.C. The zoo and Smithsonian museums closed to the public because of the partial government shutdown. Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Getty Images

A U.S. park ranger gives a tourist suggestions of other nearby places to visit while Joshua Tree National Park was shut down in 2013. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Here's What Would Happen If The Government Shuts Down This Week

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Federal workers are being advised by a government ethics agency to avoid discussing impeachment or what's known as the "resistance" movement to President Trump while at the workplace. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Ethics Agency Warns Federal Workers Not To Discuss Impeachment Or 'Resistance'

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David Shulkin (center), the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs undersecretary of health, talks with attendees in July prior to testifying at a Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee hearing in Gilbert, Ariz. Donald Trump has selected Shulkin to lead the agency. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Hiring Freeze And Obamacare Repeal Could Clobber Veterans Affairs

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High on President-elect Donald Trump's list of activities for his first 100 days is a hiring freeze on all civilian federal jobs that aren't in public safety. Tom Thai/Flickr hide caption

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Tom Thai/Flickr

Trump Wants A Federal Hiring Freeze, But It May Not Save Money

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