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Vitamin D

A serving of salmon contains about 600 IUs of vitamin D, researchers say, and a cup of fortified milk around 100. Cereals and juices are sometimes fortified, too. Check the labels, researchers say, and aim for 600 IUs daily, or 800 if you're older than 70. Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley hide caption

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Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?

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The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine recommends that most adults get about 600 international units of vitamin D per day through food or supplements, increasing that dose to 800 IUs per day for those 70 or older. essgee51/Flickr hide caption

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A Bit More Vitamin D Might Help Prevent Colds And Flu

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A team of pediatricians noticed that many of their young black and Hispanic patients were deficient in vitamin D. A hefty weekly dose of of the vitamin for two months was needed to get most of the teens' blood levels to the concentration that endocrinologists advise. Noel Hendrickson/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Noel Hendrickson/Ocean/Corbis

Disease susceptibility varies among ethnic groups, but medicine hasn't always recognized that. Jo Unruh/iStockphoto hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

If only it was as simple as popping a supplement and being set for life. But alas, no. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Spring has brought the stork and a baby who just might have a higher risk for multiple sclerosis later in life. Anna Bryukhanova/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Reducing dietary salt and alcohol, exercising, not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight are other lifestyle tweaks known to help prevent or reduce high blood pressure, doctors say. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

A woman pours two tablets into her hand from a pill bottle. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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