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Grant Burningham, who lives in Bountiful, Utah, worked to get a referendum on Medicaid expansion on the Utah ballot in November. Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

Voters In 4 States Set To Decide On Medicaid Expansion

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A sow grizzly bear spotted near Camas in northwestern Montana. Wildlife officials endorsed a plan in August to keep northwestern Montana's grizzly population at roughly 1,000 bears as the state seeks to bolster its case that lifting federal protections will not lead to the bruins' demise. Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks, via AP hide caption

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Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks, via AP

Grizzlies Have Recovered, Officials Say; Now Montanans Have To Get Along With Them

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Brian Kleinsasser, left, who works in the hog barn at Cool Spring Colony, helps Jake Waldner set up the Hutterite table during a Long Table dinner event at The Resort at Paws Up. Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up hide caption

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Stuart Thurlkill / via Paws Up

In Gun-Friendly Montana, Student Walkout Steers Clear Of Politics

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Sens. Jon Tester, left, and Steve Daines, speaking together in Jardine, Mont., in August 2017. Both said recently they want the Indian Health Service to have new, strong leadership soon. Matthew Brown/AP Photo/Matthew Brown hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP Photo/Matthew Brown

When wildfire smoke choked their community last summer, Amy Cilimburg (left), the director of Climate Smart Missoula, helped Joy and Don Dunagan, of Seeley Lake, Mont., get a HEPA air filter through a partnership with the Missoula City-County Health Department. Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

When Wildfire Smoke Invades, Who Should Pay To Clean Indoor Air?

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A head of poor-quality malt barley taken directly from a field in Power, Mont. Heat and a lack of water resulted in small and light kernels. Grain rejected for malt barley often ends up as animal feed. Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network hide caption

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Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network

Wilmot Collins, the next mayor of Helena, Mont., came to the U.S. as a refugee during Liberia's civil war. Refugees are "not bloodsuckers," he says. "We are not just here to consume the resources. We provide for the economy." Corin Cates-Carney for NPR hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney for NPR

Black-footed ferrets are the most endangered mammal in North America. Scientists in Montana are trying to save the ferrets by saving their main food source, prairie dogs. Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images

Biologists With Drones And Peanut Butter Pellets Are On A Mission To Help Ferrets

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Smoke plumes rise from the Rice Ridge Fire in August, behind Montana's Seeley Lake Elementary School, in Seeley Lake, Mont. Eric Whitney/MTPR hide caption

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Eric Whitney/MTPR

Montanans Pitch In To Bring Clean Air To Smoky Classrooms

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On July 21, Sperry Chalet was still a beautiful refuge for those who made the trek into the wilderness. Courtesty of Bret Bouda hide caption

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Courtesty of Bret Bouda

Republican Greg Gianforte speaks to supporters at a May 25 election night party in Bozeman, Mont., after being declared the winner. Janie Osborne/Getty Images hide caption

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Janie Osborne/Getty Images

The Colstrip Generating Station near Colstrip, Mont., is the second-largest coal-fired power plant in the West. Two of its four units are scheduled to close by 2022, if not sooner. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Town That Helped Power Northwest Feels Left Behind In Shift Away From Coal

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Republican Greg Gianforte greets supporters after winning a special election for the House from Montana last month. He apologized then and now has apologized in writing for assaulting a reporter. Bobby Caina Calvan/AP hide caption

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Bobby Caina Calvan/AP

Charmayne Healy (left) and Miranda Kirk (right), co-founders of the Aaniiih Nakoda Anti-Drug Movement, have helped Melinda Healy (center) with their peer-support programs. Nora Saks/MTPR hide caption

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Nora Saks/MTPR

2 Sisters Try To Tackle Drug Use At A Montana Indian Reservation

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Republican Greg Gianforte (right) welcomes Donald Trump Jr., the president's son, onto the stage at a rally in East Helena, Mont., on May 11. Gianforte, a businessman, is embracing his party's president in his race for the state's open congressional seat. Bobby Caina Calvan/AP hide caption

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Bobby Caina Calvan/AP

Rob Quist is the Democrat running in the Montana special election. Don Gonyea/NPR hide caption

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Don Gonyea/NPR

Trump Casts Shadow Over Tightening Montana Special Election

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The three candidates, from left, Republican Greg Gianforte, Democrat Rob Quist and Libertarian Mark Wicks, who are vying to fill Montana's only congressional seat. Bobby Caina Calvan/AP hide caption

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Bobby Caina Calvan/AP

Candidates Confront GOP Health Care Bill In Montana Special Election

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Rob Quist, the Democrat who's running for an open U.S. House race in Montana, campaigns at the University of Montana on April 27, 2017. Quist is a political newcomer who's a well-known country singer in the state. Josh Burnham/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Josh Burnham/Montana Public Radio

A Singing Cowboy, A Millionaire And Rifles Dominate Montana Special Election

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Emmie de Wit, who usually works in a Biosafety Level 4 Lab, spent time in less secure labs in Liberia during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Above, she prepares to test Ebola patient blood samples. Courtesy of NIAID hide caption

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Courtesy of NIAID