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Rosa Parks

In this May 28, 1957, photo, Rev. Robert S. Graetz, center, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, left, talk outside the witness room during a bombing trial in Montgomery, Ala. Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery Bus Boycott, died Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020. He was 92. AP hide caption

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Robert Graetz, Only White Pastor To Back Montgomery Bus Boycott, Dies At 92

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Georgia Rep. John Lewis near the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C., earlier this year. At StoryCorps in 2018, Lewis talked about meeting King in Montgomery, Ala., at 18. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Image hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Image

Rep. John Lewis' Fight For Civil Rights Began With A Letter To Martin Luther King Jr.

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"Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words" opened on Dec. 5 in Washington, D.C. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw/NPR

'Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words' Reveals The Real Person Behind The Icon

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Georgia Gilmore adjusts her hat for photographers in 1956 during the bus boycott trial of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Montgomery, Ala. She testified: "When you pay your fare and they count the money, they don't know the Negro money from white money." AP hide caption

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Meet The Fearless Cook Who Secretly Fed — And Funded — The Civil Rights Movement

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In a speech at the Golden Globes, Oprah Winfrey told the story of Recy Taylor's violent rape by six white men in 1944. Taylor, pictured above, died last month at age 97. Her attackers were never prosecuted. Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press

'Recy Taylor's Rape Still Haunts Us'

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Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat touched off the Montgomery bus boycott and the beginning of the civil rights movement, is fingerprinted by police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 22, 1956, when she was among several others charged with violating segregation laws. Gene Herrick/AP hide caption

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Gene Herrick/AP

In Montgomery, Rosa Parks' Story Offers A History Lesson For Police

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Rosa Parks joins in a march at the South African Embassy in Washington, Dec. 10, 1984, protesting that country's racial policies. She's famous for refusing to give up her seat on a bus in 1955, sparking the Montgomery boycotts — but her activism spanned her entire life. AP hide caption

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No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

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This undated photo shows Rosa Parks riding on the Montgomery Area Transit System bus. Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus on Dec. 1, 1955, and ignited the boycott that led to the end of legal segregation in public transportation. AP hide caption

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60 Years Later, What Can Activists Learn From The Montgomery Bus Boycott?

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Rosa Parks, shown in Seattle in 1956, saved postcards from Martin Luther King Jr. and notes about carpooling during the Montgomery Bus Boycott. They're now being cataloged by the Library of Congress. Gil Baker/Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Rosa & Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development hide caption

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Gil Baker/Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Rosa & Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development

After Years In Lockdown, Rosa Parks' Papers Head To Library Of Congress

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Schoolchildren tour the bus that civil rights icon Rosa Parks made famous when she refused to give up her seat. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

President Obama reached out to touch the statue of civil rights icon Rosa Parks during Wednesday's dedication ceremony in the U.S. Capitol. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., was behind the president. Jason Reed/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Jason Reed/Reuters /Landov