Ivory Coast Ivory Coast

Farmer Georges Kouamé Koffi holding two cocoa pods. Chocolate is made from the almond-sized cocoa beans contained in the pods. Alex Duval Smith for NPR hide caption

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Alex Duval Smith for NPR

A Dip In Global Prices Creates Cocoa Crisis For Ivory Coast's Farmers

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Issiaka Ouattara, center, spokesperson for the mutinous soldiers, speaks to journalists after the announcement of a deal with the Ivory Coast government. Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images

Salimata Sylla, a mother of three, visits Grand Bassam with her family to show she's not afraid of terrorists. On March 13, al-Qaida gunmen killed some 19 people at the beachfront town. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

A Day At The Beach Is A Way Of Saying 'We're Not Afraid' Of Terrorists

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An Ivorian soldier stands guard on March 18, 2016 at the site of a jihadist shooting rampage at the beach resort of Grand Bassam. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Ivory Coast Struggles To Keep Economy Afloat After Terror Attack

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Employees load a body into a van after heavily-armed gunmen opened fire in the Ivory Coast resort town of Grand-Bassam, leaving bodies strewn on the beach, killing more than a dozen people. The assailants, who were "heavily armed and wearing balaclavas, fired at guests at the L'Etoile du Sud, a large hotel which was full of expats in the current heatwave," a witness told AFP. Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images

Mumadou Traore says the Ivory Coast's French bureaucracy is a "blessing" when it comes to Ebola. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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Gregory Warner/NPR

No Ebola, S'il Vous Plait, We're French: The Ivory Coast Mindset

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Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?

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Former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo is surrounded by guards at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands. PETER DEJONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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PETER DEJONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS

The president of the Ivorian Constitutional Council, Paul Yao Ndre speaks at the council's headquarters on May 5, 2011 in Abidjan. ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Ivory Coast

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Ivory Coast President Alassane Ouattara addresses his nation from Abidjan after rival Laurent Gbagbo was arrested on April 11, 2011. Aristide Bodegla/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Aristide Bodegla/ASSOCIATED PRESS

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Ivory Coast

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Laurent Gbagbo, after being taken into custody. The Associated Press hide caption

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The Associated Press

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton on Gbagbo's surrender

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French President Nicolas Sarkozy. Philippe Lopez /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez /AFP/Getty Images

NPR's Renee Montagne talks with Arthur Goldhammer

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