Jobs Jobs
Stories About

Jobs

Ethan Roberts, a rising high school senior, works at a Walmart in Fayette County, Ga. He says he plans to take advantage of the company's new benefit that will pay for standardized test preparation. Courtesy of Ethan Roberts hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Ethan Roberts

Tanisha Cortez waits on a table at a restaurant in Ames, Iowa. When the previous restaurant she worked for closed, Cortez applied to others and had job offers right away. Jobs are plentiful in Ames, a small city of more than 65,000 residents tucked amid farm fields north of Des Moines. Olivia Sun for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Sun for NPR

In This Town, You Apply For A Job And You Get It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721086615/727190946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With the economy humming, U.S. unemployment is at a nearly 50-year low. Shouldn't we be excited? Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

America Is In Full Employment, So Why Aren't We Celebrating?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/722650602/724921480" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A large new study finds mixed results for the effectiveness of programs aimed at motivating healthful behavior — such as more exercise and better nutrition — among employees. Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

toggle caption
Erik Isakson/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Workers build bed frames at a factory in Commerce, Calif., near Los Angeles, in 2017. In January, the economy added a bigger-than-expected 304,000 jobs, including 13,000 in manufacturing. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Added 304,000 Jobs In January; Shutdown Boosted Unemployment To 4 Percent

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689937545/690648859" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Even the Federal Reserve has noticed ghosting, which it defines as "a situation where a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact." Planet Flem/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Planet Flem/Getty Images

In A Hot Labor Market, Some Employees Are 'Ghosting' Bad Bosses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/688303552/688839532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A worker installs a door on a 2018 Ford F-150 truck at an assembly plant in Dearborn, Mich., on Sept. 27. The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 3.7 percent in September, a nearly 50-year low. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Osorio/AP

Images of President Trump and former President Barack Obama are on television as traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. has added jobs in every month for nearly eight years. Here, a job seeker holds an employment flyer during a hiring event at an Aldi Supermarket in Darien, Ill., in July. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Joana Dudley looks at a list of job prospects at a job fair in Miami Lakes, Fla., in January. In the government's June jobs report, the unemployment rate ticked up to 4 percent with more people entering the labor force. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lynne Sladky/AP

The lunch and helmet of a Venezuelan iron worker lie on a table during lunch break, in Ciudad Piar, Bolívar state, Venezuela. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rodrigo Abd/AP

Many Venezuelan Workers Are Leaving The Job, And The Country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610132680/610632183" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript