Jobs Jobs

Ellsworth Ashman lost his middle-skill job at Entenmann's on Long Island, N.Y., last year. Now he's working at a job that pays half of what he made at the bakery. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Lane/WSHU

Despite Recovery, Middle-Wage Workers Are Being Squeezed Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/437210796/438354853" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A worker welds parts in fans for industrial ventilation systems at the Robinson Fans Inc. plant in Harmony, Pa., in February. Hourly wages in the U.S. remained unchanged last month. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Keith Srakocic/AP

Bianca Medici (left), a corporate recruiter for CDM Media, speaks with job applicants during a Chicago job fair in May. The economy added 223,000 jobs in June, and unemployment fell to its lowest rate since 2008. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

toggle caption
M. Spencer Green/AP

Georgia Leads A Push To Help Ex-Prisoners Get Jobs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/419162376/419405979" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the face-to-face interview process, research shows that managers tend to hire applicants who are similar to them on paper. Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bjorn Rune Lie/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Blind Auditions Could Give Employers A Better Hiring Sense

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/410264592/410340245" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Engaging, mentally stimulating work is good for the brain, scientists say, whether you get paid to do it or not. Running a household can be as mentally demanding as running a company. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Oakland Kids Get A Raise From The New Minimum Wage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394328003/395238661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ilana Kohn/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Now Algorithms Are Deciding Whom To Hire, Based On Voice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394827451/394906629" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Proponents of the terminal plan say it would bring economic development to the Vancouver area, just across the Columbia River from Portland, Ore. Conrad Wilson/OPB News hide caption

toggle caption
Conrad Wilson/OPB News

Northwest Oil Terminal Plan Would Mean Jobs — And More Oil Trains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/390727189/390757816" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An oil well in Garden City, Texas. With prices plunging, oil companies are laying off thousands of workers. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

As Oil Prices Tank, Firms Large And Small Feel The Pain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/387539924/387554262" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript