Affordable Care Act Affordable Care Act

Demonstrators held signs outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington DC on June 26, 2018 while Democratic leaders called on the Trump administration to uphold the preexisting conditions provision of the Affordable Care Act. Now the issue may be decided in court. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Despite the political uncertainties, insurance companies have started to learn how to make a profit on the plans they offer through the Affordable Care Act. Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Analysts Predict Health Care Marketplace Premiums Will Stabilize For 2019 Coverage

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If you earn too much to get a subsidy to help defray the cost of health insurance, you might find a less expensive policy off an exchange. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Changes from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services could affect how some hospitals operate. David Sacks/Getty Images hide caption

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David Sacks/Getty Images

President Trump, pictured in July 2017. Four cities are suing Trump and his administration for allegedly undermining the Affordable Care Act in violation of the Constitution. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Short-term health care plans could be a more affordable option for some consumers, but they're exempt from covering people with pre-existing conditions. Dreet Production/Alloy/Getty Images hide caption

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Dreet Production/Alloy/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (from left), Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Vice President Pence met on Capitol Hill Tuesday, ahead of meetings with Republican senators. Democrats vow to challenge Kavanaugh's nomination in upcoming hearings. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Charlie Wood of Charlottesville, Va., plays with bubbles during a May 4, 2017, rally near the Capitol to oppose proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act. Charlie was born a few months prematurely, and her mother, Rebecca (left), fears changes to the health law will negatively affect her care. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

California is starting to push hospitals throughout the state to lower their rates of medically unnecessary C-sections. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images

California's Message To Hospitals: Shape Up Or Lose 'In-Network' Status

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Patients with private insurance like the drug coupons because they can help make specialty medicines more affordable. But health care analysts say the coupons may also discourage patients from considering appropriate lower-cost alternatives, including generic drugs. DNY59/Getty Images hide caption

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DNY59/Getty Images

The House bill calls for $65 million in loans and grants, administered by the USDA, to establish "association-style" health plans that likely wouldn't have to cover hospitalization, prescription drugs or emergency care. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

The new exemptions will mostly apply to penalty payments tied to 2018 taxes and to the previous two years. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

Money deposited in a health savings account is tax-deductible, grows tax-free and can be used to pay for medical expenses. The annual maximum allowable contribution to an HSA is slightly lower for some people this year. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine (center), is joined on Wednesday by Sen. Lindsey Graham (from left), R-S.C., Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. Collins was pushing for provisions in the budget bill aimed at lowering premiums for people purchasing health insurance in the Affordable Care Act's marketplaces. That didn't happen. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter says Thursday's letter from the Trump administration "was not a rejection of our approach," but rather an invitation to keep talking about how to make Idaho's state-based health plans pass muster. Otto Kitsinger/AP hide caption

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Otto Kitsinger/AP

Confused about whether your health plan is ACA-compliant? To be sure you're using your state's official marketplace, start with HealthCare.gov, and click on "see if I can change." Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar faced questions Wednesday from the House Ways and Means Committee about Idaho's move. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

When President Trump decided to stop making the cost-sharing reduction payments to health insurers, New York and Minnesota lost significant funding to a health program that covers more than 800,000 low-income residents. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Critics say Idaho's insurance department can't unilaterally ignore federal law, including some of the Affordable Care Act's protections for people with pre-existing conditions. Otto Kitsinger/AP hide caption

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Otto Kitsinger/AP

A sign in support of Oregon's Measure 101 is displayed by a homeowner along a roadside in Lake Oswego, Ore. Tuesday's special election puts decisions over how the state funds Medicaid in voters' hands. Gillian Flaccus/AP hide caption

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Gillian Flaccus/AP

Part Of Oregon's Funding Plan For Medicaid Goes Before Voters

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Demonstrators protest at Sen. Dean Heller's, R-Nev., office in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP