Affordable Care Act Affordable Care Act

Rosemary Warnock, a registered nurse at Maine Health, exits the Merrill Auditorium voting station in Portland, Maine, early Tuesday. She said she was motivated to vote for Medicaid expansion. Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben McCanna/Press Herald via Getty Images

After Maine Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion, Governor Raises Objections

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Minnesota's ACA insurance exchange, MNsure, is spending state money this year to hire health care navigators who reach out to consumers to answer questions and help them find the right health plan. Mark Zdechlik/MPR News hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR News

Need Help Picking An ACA Health Plan? Some States Are Reaching Out

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Diane Brown, executive director of the Arizona Public Interest Research Group, talks to college students about the benefits of buying health coverage on the exchanges. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

With ACA Plans A Tougher Sell, Insurers Bring On The Puppies

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People hoping to get health insurance coverage in 2018 may need to make sure their 2017 premiums are paid. Busakorn Pongparnit/Getty Images hide caption

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Busakorn Pongparnit/Getty Images

Yudelmy Cataneda (from left), Javier Suarez and Claudia Suarez talk about health insurance with Yosmay Valdivian (right), an insurance agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, at the Mall of Americas in Miami in 2014. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Christy Torres of Foundations Communities in Austin contacts people who bought insurance on Healthcare.Gov. to tell them it's almost time to renew. Martin Do Nascimento/KUT hide caption

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Martin Do Nascimento/KUT

With Federal Funds Cut, Others Must Lead Health Insurance Sign-Up Efforts

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Ilia Henderson (left) is planning to sign up for a health insurance plan on the federal marketplace with help from Charlotte, N.C.-based navigator Julieanne Taylor (right) again this year. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

Reductions In Federal Funding For Health Law Navigators Cut Unevenly

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The Washington Post reports that President Trump, shown here with former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, personally intervened to delay approval of Iowa's waiver application. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump applauds members of the audience before speaking at the Heritage Foundation's annual President's Club meeting on Tuesday evening. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Most employers are likely to continue paying for birth control for women. But there are exceptions. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

As Trump Alters Affordable Care Act, Programs To Aid, Enroll Users Are Cut

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New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says he is joining with peers in California and several other states to file a lawsuit to protect the insurers' subsidies. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump made some big decisions about health care this week, including cutting off subsidies that benefit lower- and middle-class families. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump talks Thursday about an executive order to ease the way for groups of employers to offer health insurance. Later, the administration said it would halt subsidy payments to insurers. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Neal Siegel, who lives with his girlfriend, Beth Wargo, is one of six disabled Iowans suing the state over its privatized Medicaid program. Clay Masters/IPR hide caption

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Clay Masters/IPR

Patients, Health Insurers Challenge Iowa's Effort To Privatize Medicaid

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Paul Melquist says he is frustrated that his insurance costs are so high because he would like to be able to do more for his grandchildren — Adalyn, Mason and Carys — in his retirement. Courtesy of the Melquist family/KHN hide caption

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Courtesy of the Melquist family/KHN

Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., argued for upholding the Affordable Care Act's birth control provision in 2015. The rollback of the rule is likely to spur further lawsuits, analysts say. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Trump Guts Requirement That Employer Health Plans Pay For Birth Control

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Bernard Tyson, CEO of Kaiser Permanente, is optimistic about a bipartisan health bill. He cautions that partisanship will only lead to more insurance instability. Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Kaiser Permanente CEO Says A Bipartisan Health Bill Is The Best Way Forward

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