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Affordable Care Act

Monday

Tuesday

Monday

The advice for anyone who got their IRS return rejected because a rogue agent signed them up for ACA health insurance: Ask for an extension and file a complaint. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Monday

A record number of Americans are getting health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, and states that use the HealthCare.gov marketplace are vulnerable to a scheme where plans are switched without the consumer's permission. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Monday

Insurance brokers say rogue agents are switching batches of customers to new plans without the customers' knowledge. The agents then collect monthly commissions on the Affordable Care Act plans. Ralf Hahn/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralf Hahn/Getty Images

Friday

Mary Lou Retton performs on the balance beam in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. Last week, she said she couldn't afford health insurance and owes big hospital bills after a serious illness. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Wednesday

Secretary Xavier Becerra, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Becerra announced Wednesday his agency is seeing record enrollment numbers for Affordable Care Act health plans. Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for National Urban League hide caption

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Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for National Urban League

For the third year in a row, ACA health insurance plans see record signups

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Tuesday

Thursday

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services building is shown in Washington, D.C. A proposed rule will expand government-funded health care access to DACA recipients. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

The Affordable Care Act saw a record number of sign ups this year, but some people are having trouble finding doctors in their health plan networks. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Tuesday

Prescription drug coverage is just one part of Medicare, the federal government's health insurance program for people age 65 and over. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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d3sign/Getty Images

Why Medicare is suddenly under debate again

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Friday

A health care navigator helps people sign up for Obamacare plans in Dallas in 2017. This year, federal funding for navigators was higher than it had been under the Trump administration. A record number of people signed up for plans. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

More than 16 million people bought insurance on Healthcare.gov, a record high

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Monday

Subin Yang for NPR

Shopping for ACA health insurance? Here's what's new this year

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Wednesday

Screening mammograms, like this one in Chicago in 2012, are among a number of preventive health services the Affordable Care Act has required health plans to cover at no charge to patients. But that could change, if the Sept. 7 ruling by a federal district judge in Texas is upheld on appeal. Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Tuesday

Research shows that expanded access to preventive care and coverage has led to an increase in colon cancer screenings, vaccinations, use of contraception and chronic disease screenings. Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm