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Affordable Care Act

Overall, U.S. health spending is more than twice the average of other Western nations, and it's not just a matter of high drug prices. No wonder voters list health and the high price of care as one of their major election concerns as they head to the polls. YinYang/Getty Images hide caption

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YinYang/Getty Images

Student demonstrators cheered in 2015 outside the Supreme Court after learning that the high court had upheld the Affordable Care Act as law of the land. But Republican foes of the federal health law are still working to have it struck down. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Since its passage, the Affordable Care Act has been the subject of multiple court cases and attempts to derail it in Congress — attempts that garnered protests in 2017 and beyond. The law has survived, so far, but a key provision was struck down Wednesday in federal court. Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Consumers hoping to buy individual health care plans on HealthCare.gov have until Wednesday at 3 a.m. ET to sign up. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Government Extends Open Enrollment For ACA Health Plans, But Only For 36 Hours

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Families affected by preexisting medical conditions attend a Capitol Hill news conference in 2018 in support of the Affordable Care Act. Prior to the ACA, insurers could refuse to cover people who had even mild preexisting conditions — or charge them much more. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Health insurers say the U.S. government owes them more than $12 billion in payments that were rescinded by a Republican-controlled Congress. The money was supposed to subsidize insurers' expected losses between 2014 and 2016. Phil Roeder/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Roeder/Getty Images

Presidential candidates recognize health care is a key voting concern. But polled Democrats don't yet agree on the best solution. Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Enrollment help was plentiful for insurance sign-ups in the early years of the Affordable Care Act, such as at this clinic in Bear, Del., in 2014. Though the Trump administration has since slashed the outreach budget, about 930,000 people have signed up for ACA health plans so far this year. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A demonstrator celebrated outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2015 after the court voted to uphold key tax subsidies that are part of the Affordable Care Act. But federal taxes and other measures designed to pay for the health care the ACA provides have not fared as well. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

"The profession we love has been taken over," psychiatrist and novelist Samuel Shem tells NPR, "with us sitting there in front of screens all day, doing data entry in a computer factory." Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

President Trump talked to seniors about health care in central Florida in early October. "We eliminated Obamacare's horrible, horrible, very expensive and very unfair, unpopular individual mandate," Trump told the crowd. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Is Trying Hard To Thwart Obamacare. How's That Going?

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The latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act, Texas v. Azar, was argued in July in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. Attorney Robert Henneke, representing the plaintiffs, spoke outside the courthouse on July 9. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP