Affordable Care Act Affordable Care Act

Home health care workers Jasmine Almodovar (far right) and Artheta Peters (center) take part in a Cleveland rally for higher pay on Sept. 4. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN, Ideastream hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN, Ideastream

Home Health Workers Struggle For Better Pay And Health Insurance

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Dr. Angela Alday talks with Isidro Hernandes, via a Spanish-speaking interpreter, Armando Jimenez. Both patient and doctor say they much prefer an in-person interpreter to one on the phone. Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare hide caption

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Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare

In The Hospital, A Bad Translation Can Destroy A Life

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An official at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor says its mix of patients helps explain the infection rates. Scott C. Soderberg/Courtesy of University of Michigan Health System hide caption

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Scott C. Soderberg/Courtesy of University of Michigan Health System

Hospitals Struggle To Beat Back Serious Infections

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The California Public Employees' Retirement System has capped how much it will pay for some common medical procedures and tests. Max Whittaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Max Whittaker/Getty Images

One rationale for extending Medicaid coverage to more people is to help them get to a doctor or clinic before a minor illness becomes a medical emergency. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A sign displaying calorie counts is seen in a Subway restaurant in New York City in 2008. A yet-to-be-finalized federal rule requiring big chain restaurants to post calorie counts has likely led eateries to tweak their menus. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Restaurants Shave Calories Off New Menu Items

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In New Jersey in March, Dianna Lopez of the Center for Family Services (right) speaks with Betsy Cruz, of Camden, N.J., about health insurance coverage during an Affordable Care Act information session. Lori M. Nichols/South Jersey Times/Landov hide caption

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Lori M. Nichols/South Jersey Times/Landov

Obamacare's First Year: How'd It Go?

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Construction is continuing at the Maryland Proton Treatment Center in downtown Baltimore. It's one of three such centers under development in the Washington, D.C., region. Jenny Gold/KHN hide caption

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Jenny Gold/KHN

Proton Center Closure Doesn't Slow New Construction

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Kevin Wierhs and Susan Johnson confer about what works and what doesn't in managing diabetes. Sarah McCammon/Georgia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/Georgia Public Broadcasting

To Prevent Repeat Hospitalizations, Talk To Patients

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David Combs, an insurance broker in Kentucky, wound up benefiting from the Affordable Care Act, even though early on he had figured the law would put brokers out of business. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News

Insurance Brokers Key To Kentucky's Obamacare Success

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Michael Granillo and his wife Sonia await treatment at an emergency room in Northridge, Calif. Anna Gorman, Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Anna Gorman, Kaiser Health News

Avoid The Rush! Some ERs Are Taking Appointments

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Congress Quietly Extends The Budget — Past Election Day, Anyway

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