Affordable Care Act Affordable Care Act
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As Trump And Congress Flip-Flop On Health Care, Insurers Try To Plan Ahead

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Roughly 2 million of the kids covered by the Children's Health Insurance Program have a chronic health condition, such as asthma. LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Prescription drug coverage is one benefit that drives up insurance costs, and one that is very popular with consumers. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., has drawn up a proposed amendment to the GOP health care bill, hoping to attract enough support to pass the House. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chair of the House Freedom Caucus, speaks during a news conference in February on Affordable Care Act replacement legislation. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

Voters Back Home Don't Mind If Mark Meadows Bucks Authority

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Carl Goulden, of Littlestown Pa., developed hepatitis B 10 years ago. Soon his health insurance premiums soared beyond a price he and his wife could afford. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

U.S. Health Care Wrestles With The 'Pre-Existing Condition'

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People who lacked health insurance for more than three consecutive months in 2016, or who bought individual insurance and got federal help paying the premiums, will need to do a little work to figure out what, if anything, they owe the IRS. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Tax Day And Health Insurance Under Trump

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The Trump administration is proposing changes to Obamacare that the White House says should stabilize the insurance marketplace. But critics of the proposal see big bumps ahead for consumers. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Members of Congress and their staffs seeking health insurance this year could choose from among 57 gold plans (from four insurers) sold on D.C.'s small business marketplace. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Though they failed to mobilize Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act last month, Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) (right), Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and the White House could still undercut the insurance exchanges, reduce Medicaid benefits and let states limit coverage of birth control or prenatal visits. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback opposes legislative efforts to expand the state's Medicaid program. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Orlin Wagner/AP

With Obamacare Here to Stay, Some States Revive Medicaid Expansion

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Celeste Thompson, 57, a home care worker in Missoula, Mont., examines a pill bottle in her home. Thompson cares for her husband, and worries that if she loses her Medicaid coverage she won't be able to afford to see a doctor. Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Mike Albans for Kaiser Health News