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Affordable Care Act

Enrollment counselor Vue Yang (left) reviews health insurance options for Laura San Nicolas (center), accompanied by her daughter, Geena, 17, at Sacramento Covered in Sacramento, Calif., in February. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

At sign-up events like this one in Los Angeles in 2013, Covered California pledged "affordability" in health insurance as one of its main selling points. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

The IRS released preliminary figures that show about three-quarters of taxpayers indicated they had qualifying health insurance in 2014. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Steve Heller has worked for Minnesota's John Henry Foster company for 15 years. He says he likes the greater choice of health plans he now has because of the private exchange. Mark Zdechlik/MPR hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR

More Health Plan Choices At Work: What's The Catch?

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Dr. Annelys Hernandez (left) checks out Cynthia Louis (right) in Florida International University's Mobile Health Center in Miami on March 3, 2015. Courtesy of WLRN/Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald hide caption

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Courtesy of WLRN/Peter Andrew Bosch/Miami Herald

In Florida, A Former Fast-Food Worker Lands In Medicaid Gap

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An American flag flies over the U.S. Supreme Court June 29, 2015 in Washington, D.C. This past term, the liberal position won in 19 of the 26 closely-divided ideological cases and eight out of 10 of the most important ones. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Liberal Minority Won Over Conservatives In Historic Supreme Court Term

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President Obama and Vice President Biden shake hands after the president spoke in the White House's Rose Garden Thursday about the Supreme Court decision in favor of Obamacare. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

The Oklahoma State Capitol is one of many legal battlegrounds that remain for the Affordable Care Act. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

President Obama delivers remarks in the Rose Garden after the U.S. Supreme Court's 6-3 ruling to uphold the nationwide availability of tax subsidies that are crucial to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gary Cameron/Reuters/Landov

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act cheer outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., after a majority on the court ruled that Obamacare tax credits can continue to go to residents of any state. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images