Affordable Care Act Affordable Care Act
Stories About

Affordable Care Act

Nurses Patricia Wegener (left) and Susan Davis at Mercy Hospital can monitor the condition of a patient who is miles away via the hospital's technology. But some health insurers and analysts remain skeptical that telemedicine saves money. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Smith/KCUR

Telemedicine Expands, Though Financial Prospects Still Uncertain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/444236446/444660134" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doris Keene (right) talks with her acupuncturist before a treatment at Portland's Quest Center for Integrative Health. Keene says the treatments have eased her chronic back pain at least as effectively as the Vicodin and muscle relaxants she once relied on. Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

To Curb Pain Without Opioids, Oregon Looks To Alternative Treatments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436905063/442441866" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marilyn Kruse couldn't get health insurance through her job as a substitute teacher in Jefferson County, Colo. Now she buys insurance through the state's health exchange. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
John Daley/Colorado Public Radio

In Colorado, More People Are Insured But Cost Remains An Issue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/440887260/440914154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Medicaid office employee works on reports at Montefiore Medical Center in New York in late 2014. New York expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act and enrollment surged. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Jacobson/AP

Isaiah Roggow, a third-year medical student at the University of California, Riverside, examines patient Becky Ketchum during the school's free clinic. Rebecca Plevin/KPCC hide caption

toggle caption
Rebecca Plevin/KPCC

Medical Schools Teach Students To Talk With Patients About Care Costs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/438496145/439247053" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Outreach coordinator Sonny Weahkee (left) talks with a restaurant customer about health insurance for Native Americans in Shiprock, N.M., in early August. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Spreading The Word: Obamacare Is For Native Americans, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435581014/436966838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Valerie Davidson, Alaska's health and social services commissioner, drives her 1983 Chevy truck to pick up salmon for a dinner party for 50 people. Annie Fiedt/Alaska Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Annie Fiedt/Alaska Public Media

Fishing, Cooking And A Yup'ik Upbringing Made Alaska's Health Commissioner

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436327115/436525836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jo Ann Farwell, a retired social worker, has a brain tumor; she wanted to make sure her sons were clear about her end-of-life wishes. So, after talking with her doctor, she filled out a form that Oregon provides to ease those family conversations. Alan Sylvestre/Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Alan Sylvestre/Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Medicare Says Doctors Should Get Paid To Discuss End-Of-Life Issues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/427041879/432683736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cris and Valerie Fiore hold one of their favorite pictures of their sons Anthony (with the dark hair) and Nick. Anthony died from a heroin overdose in May 2014 at the age of 24. Cris Fiore's eulogy described his son's death as a shock, but "not a surprise." Anthony had been addicted to heroin for years. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Allen/WITF

When Rehab Might Help An Addict — But Insurance Won't Cover It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/430437514/432453548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brenda Hummel and her 7-year-old daughter Andrea in their home near Des Moines, Iowa. Andrea was born with severe epilepsy and gets her health care through Medicaid. Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio

Patients In Iowa Worry About Private Management Of Medicaid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/429337290/430077509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript