health care overhaul health care overhaul

Isabel Diaz Tinoco and Jose Luis Tinoco had some questions for the Miami insurance agent who helped guide them in signing up for a HealthCare.gov policy at the Mall of the Americas in November. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

HealthCare.gov Enrollment Ends Friday. Sign-Ups Likely To Trail Last Year's

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President Trump spoke from the White House in July in an effort to promote health overhaul legislation. He's now trying to make changes through an executive order. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Trump Says He'll Sign Order To Expand Health Insurance Options

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Roughly 1.4 million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, and two-thirds are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal health care program for people with low incomes or disabilities. Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Blend Images/Getty Images

Sens. Lindsey Graham (from left), Bill Cassidy and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell take questions during a press conference Tuesday. Graham and Cassidy were among the co-sponsors of a proposal to overhaul the Affordable Care Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

Calls for tort reform in regards to medical malpractice are popular on the campaign trail. But research shows that costs from medical liability make up just 2 to 2.5 percent of total health care spending in the U.S. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, seen walking to the House chamber on Wednesday, says he has the votes needed to pass the GOP health care bill on Thursday. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

According to the Congressional Budget Office, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act would lead to 24 million people losing insurance. But that could depend on how you define "insurance." Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Getty Images/iStockphoto

U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., speaks at a press conference Wednesday on Republican plans to delay enactment of the Affordable Care Act. Looking on are Sens. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and John Cornyn, R-Texas. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Health Law Spared Young Adults From High Hospital Bills

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Oregon's Math Problem: How To Measure Health?

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Some insurers prefer to pay for manual breast pumps, but some working moms prefer more expensive, electric models. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Law Says Insurers Should Pay For Breast Pumps, But Which Ones?

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