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Seeing dogs all day has its perks, veterinary neurologist Carrie Jurney says. But it also has downsides, including stress, debt, long hours and facing online harassment. Janet Delaney for NPR hide caption

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Janet Delaney for NPR

Veterinarians Are Killing Themselves. An Online Group Is There To Listen And Help

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Dr. Amir Khalil, a veterinarian with the animal rescue charity Four Paws International, carries a sedated coyote at a zoo in Rafah in the Gaza Strip, during the evacuation of animals in April. Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images

THC, a key psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is toxic to dogs, veterinarians warn. So keeping dogs away from discarded joints, edible marijuana or drug-tainted poop is important. Hillary Kladke/Getty Images hide caption

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Hillary Kladke/Getty Images

Legal Weed Is A Danger To Dogs. Here's How To Know If Your Pup Got Into Pot

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In this Jan. 9 photo, Dr. Erik Clary of Oklahoma State University holds a puppy named Milo, born with his front paws facing up instead of down and unable to walk.The dog is recovering after surgery. Derinda Blakeney/AP hide caption

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Derinda Blakeney/AP

The authors of a new study on veterinarians and mental health say vet school should include more training on how to cope with the moral distress vets face when asked by pet owners to do things that are against their medical judgment. Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images

Worker Esperanza Yanez gives a cow a full physical. She says she's learned to spot a sick cow just by looking at it. Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Esther Honig/Harvest Public Media

A cat stands on a playhouse in New Jersey, which could become the first state to ban the practice of declawing cats. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

A Declaw Law? Veterinarians Divided Over N.J. Cat Claw Bill

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Dr. Douglas Aspros holds a patient not covered by the Affordable Care Act. Courtesy of Douglas Aspros hide caption

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Courtesy of Douglas Aspros