Education Education
Stories About

Education

At most of India's private engineering and medical schools, a certain number of spots in the freshman class, usually about 15%, are reserved for the college's management to allocate at its discretion. Cargo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cargo/Getty Images

When Students In India Can't Earn College Admission On Merit, They Buy Their Way In

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/745182272/745237689" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People cycle past a building at Peking University in Beijing in 2016. The university hosts Yenching Academy, a prestigious graduate studies program. Thomas Peter/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Peter/Reuters

American Graduates Of China's Yenching Academy Are Being Questioned By The FBI

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/746355146/747504801" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this 2011 photo, Hu Jintao, then China's president, visits the Confucius Institute at the Walter Payton College Preparatory High School in Chicago. China established more than 100 Confucius Institutes, which provide language and culture programs, at U.S. schools. But at least 13 universities have dropped the program due to a law that raises concerns about Chinese spying. Chris Walker/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Walker/AP

As Scrutiny Of China Grows, Some U.S. Schools Drop A Language Program

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741239298/748972115" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students attend a Ukrainian language and literature lesson at a school in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk in 2016. In 2018, students in four cities across Ukraine received training to help them identify disinformation, propaganda and hate speech. Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images

Students sit in class at Jamia Muhammadia, a madrassa in the Pakistani capital Islamabad. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Diaa Hadid/NPR

Pakistan Wants To Reform Madrassas. Experts Advise Fixing Public Education First

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682917845/683691240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A church near the school was destroyed during the fight to oust ISIS from Raqqa, Syria. Ruth Sherlock/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ruth Sherlock/NPR

Determined To Seek An Education, Teenagers In Raqqa, Syria, Create Their Own School

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/680525061/680538353" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos faces a new lawsuit filed on Tuesday. It alleges the Dept. of Education has failed to comply with the Borrowers Defense rule, a student loan forgiveness program that would automatically cancel debt for borrowers whose schools have closed. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Camila Vargas-Restrepo/NPR

Schoolchildren are led through a dance routine at a U.S. government-supported childcare center in Raqqa. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Dixon/NPR

In Syria, A School Helps Children Traumatized By War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657010704/658253891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kennedy Odede (in blue shirt) is dancing for a good reason. The charity he and his wife started has been awarded the $2 million Hilton Humanitarian Prize. He's joined by residents of Kibera, the neighborhood in Nairobi where his nonprofit group provides educational, health and clean water services. Anwar Sadat hide caption

toggle caption
Anwar Sadat

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at the Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies event in May. On Tuesday, the departments of Justice and Education announced that they have retracted documents that advised schools on how they could legally consider race in admissions and other decisions. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ross D. Franklin/AP

Rates of "summer melt" are highest for students from lower-income backgrounds, especially if their own parents didn't go through the college application process. Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images

Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/621023537/623286435" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In midcentury home economic classes, girls learned to cook for their future husbands while boys took shop. But now kids might learn about healthy relationships or how to balance a bank account. Mark Jay Goebel/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Jay Goebel/Getty Images