Education Education

Schoolchildren are led through a dance routine at a U.S. government-supported childcare center in Raqqa. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

In Syria, A School Helps Children Traumatized By War

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Kennedy Odede (in blue shirt) is dancing for a good reason. The charity he and his wife started has been awarded the $2 million Hilton Humanitarian Prize. He's joined by residents of Kibera, the neighborhood in Nairobi where his nonprofit group provides educational, health and clean water services. Anwar Sadat hide caption

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Anwar Sadat

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at the Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies event in May. On Tuesday, the departments of Justice and Education announced that they have retracted documents that advised schools on how they could legally consider race in admissions and other decisions. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Rates of "summer melt" are highest for students from lower-income backgrounds, especially if their own parents didn't go through the college application process. Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images

Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

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In midcentury home economic classes, girls learned to cook for their future husbands while boys took shop. But now kids might learn about healthy relationships or how to balance a bank account. Mark Jay Goebel/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Jay Goebel/Getty Images

Sam Oozevaseuk Schimmel, 18, has grown up in both Alaska and Washington state. He is an advocate for Alaska Native youth. Kiliii Yuyan for NPR hide caption

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Kiliii Yuyan for NPR

The Conflicting Educations Of Sam Schimmel

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As a Ph.D. student at Texas A&M University, Mario Suarez is researching ways teachers can help LGBTQ youth. Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

Coming Out As Transgender Strengthened This Teacher's Commitment To His Students

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West Virginia teachers, students and supporters hold signs on a Morgantown, W.Va., street on Saturday. The strike is in its second weekend after the state Senate failed to pass the 5 percent raise teachers are demanding. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images