Education Education

Education may help brains cope with cognitive decline, and treatments for high blood pressure and other health problems may decrease dementia risk. Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Dementia Risk Declines, And Education May Be One Reason Why

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Margaret Feldman helps students (from left) Al Nagib Conteh, 17, and Devin Butler, 18, as they work through their FAFSA applications. Conteh's father, Ahmed Conteh (back), is there to help his son through some of the harder questions. Mayra Linares/NPR hide caption

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Mayra Linares/NPR

Hey Students, Applying For College Aid Is Easier! (But Still Hard)

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Oak Hill Middle School students say goodbye to METCO students heading back to Boston on the bus. Kieran Kesner for NPR hide caption

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Kieran Kesner for NPR

Why Busing Didn't End School Segregation

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Ethnic Yi schoolgirls take a break halfway down the mountain, on their way from their homes in Atule'er village to their first day of school in a new semester. The difficulty of getting up and down the mountain has made it hard for villagers to shake off poverty, and made it challenging for their children to attend school. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

A Harrowing, Mountain-Scaling Commute For Chinese Schoolkids

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Jeffrey Wood has been studying at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies. He is now preparing for a career as a diplomat. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

For U.S. Minority Students In China, The Welcome Comes With Scrutiny

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Critics voice concern over this proposed Mexican-American heritage textbook. Some scholars on in the subject say that the textbook, "Mexican American Heritage," is riddled with factual errors, is missing content and promotes racism and culturally offensive stereotypes. Courtesy of Momentum Instruction hide caption

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Courtesy of Momentum Instruction

Jacqueline de Chollet of Switzerland, now 78, helped found the Veerni Institute, which gives child brides and other girls in northern India a chance to continue their education. Yana Paskova for NPR hide caption

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Yana Paskova for NPR

A Chance Encounter On A Vacation Changed Her Life — And The Lives Of Child Brides

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A New Course At Arkansas Colleges: How To Not Get Pregnant

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Students perform a creative writing exercise at Cold Water Well Middle School. Students write descriptive prose from the perspective of a human statue, a blind person feeling the statue, and an outside observer. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In China, Some Schools Are Playing With More Creativity, Less Cramming

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Republican vice presidential nominee Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana takes photos with supporters during a Welcome Home Rally on Saturday in Zionsville, Ind. Pence is a passionate advocate for school choice and state control over federal oversight. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP