Education Education

After years as punk rockers, Jeneda (right) and Clayson Benally formed the band Sihasin, which means "hope" in Navajo. "We have every possibility to make positive change," says Jeneda. Courtesy of Sihasin hide caption

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Courtesy of Sihasin

Bringing Music And A Message Of Hope To Native American Youth

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Fadzai Kundishora (left) can no longer go to school because her family can't afford the fees. She spends days at home with her grandmother Miriam Kundishora, doing chores. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Why Isn't 14-Year-Old Fadzai In School? Zimbabwe's Education Dilemma

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Striking French teachers hold a German flag as they take part in a nationwide protest against new measures aimed at revamping the country's school system, in Marseille, France, on May 19. France's 840,000 teachers are largely opposed to the reform, their unions say, fearing it will increase competition between schools and exacerbate inequalities. Jean-Paul Pelissier/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jean-Paul Pelissier/Reuters/Landov

Does Less Latin Mean Dumbing Down? France Debates School Reform

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A group of mothers and infants celebrate a recent graduation from the Harlem Children's Zone Baby College program. Marty Lipp/Courtesy of Harlem Children's Zone hide caption

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Marty Lipp/Courtesy of Harlem Children's Zone

Boosting Education For Babies And Their Parents

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At Montana's Nkwusm Salish Language School, teacher Echo Brown works with a student learning Salish words. Luk means "wood" or "stick." Picct means "leaf" and solsi translates to "fire." Courtesy of Nkwusm Salish Language School hide caption

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Courtesy of Nkwusm Salish Language School

Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language Immersion Programs

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Safeena Husain says: "I educate girls." Her efforts have brought 80,000 Indian girls into school; last week she received a Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship (above). Courtesy of Skoll Foundation/Gabriel Diamond hide caption

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Courtesy of Skoll Foundation/Gabriel Diamond

At her home in the U.K., Malala Yousafzai reads her letter to the missing Nigerian schoolgirls. Courtesy of Malala Fund hide caption

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Courtesy of Malala Fund

Listen to Malala read her letter

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New Orleans educator Jonathan Johnson is founder and CEO of the Rooted School. Jonathan Johnson hide caption

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Jonathan Johnson

New Orleans Educator Dreams Of Teaching Tech To Beat The Streets

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