Nigeria Nigeria

Abdul-Azeez Buba, 33, Borno, Nigeria: "Before Boko Haram attacked my community, I was a successful building engineer. I made a lot of money from constructing houses." Etinosa Yvonne Osayimwen/Courtesy of www.etinosayvonne.me hide caption

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Etinosa Yvonne Osayimwen/Courtesy of www.etinosayvonne.me

Nigeria President Muhammadu Buhari, pictured at the White House in April 2018, called for calm and vowed to bring the perpetrators of Sunday's attack to justice. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lola Omolola is the founder of FIN, a private Facebook group with nearly 1.7 million members that has become a support network for women around the globe. Nolis Anderson for NPR hide caption

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Nolis Anderson for NPR

One Woman's Facebook Success Story: A Support Group For 1.7 Million

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A Nigerian sex worker in Italy waits for clients. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP

Italian Cops Try To Stop A Sex Trafficking Gang Called Black Axe

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Ya Kaka, left, and Hauwa, right, who were captured by Boko Haram in 2014, pose with Statue of Liberty impersonators in Times Square. Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed hide caption

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Stephanie Sinclair /Too Young to Wed

Photographer Lorenzo Vitturi assembled this collage of products sold at the street market of Lagos Island, Nigeria, including the T-shirt that gave him the title for his new book: "Money Must Be Made." Lorenzo Vitturi hide caption

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Lorenzo Vitturi

A mural showing a teacher leading a young girl to school is riddled with bullet holes after an attack by Boko Haram militants last month. They attacked the Dapchi Government Girls Science and Technology College in northeast Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones

In Nigeria, Distraught Parents Demand Answers After Boko Haram Kidnaps 110 Girls

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Soldiers drive past a sign leading to the Government Girls Science and Technical College staff quarters in Dapchi, Nigeria, on Thursday. Scores of schoolgirls have been reported missing in Monday's suspected Boko Haram attack. AMINU ABUBAKAR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AMINU ABUBAKAR/AFP/Getty Images

At a marketplace in Lagos, a tray of garri, a powdery foodstuff made from cassava that can be eaten or drunk. During dry season, rats scavenge for food and can spread Lassa fever by defecating or urinating in foods like garri. Pius Utomi Ekpei /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pius Utomi Ekpei /AFP/Getty Images

The European Court of Justice in Luxembourg, seen here in 2015, ruled Thursday that psychological tests of sexual orientation may not be used to rule on asylum applications. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

In the play The Homecoming Queen, Kelechi (played by Mfoniso Udofia) is a best-selling novelist who returns to her native village in Nigeria for the first time since leaving for the U.S. 15 years earlier. Ahron R. Foster hide caption

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Ahron R. Foster