Nigeria Nigeria

Sale Tambaya, a cattle herder in central Nigeria, grazes his cows. After his home state criminalized open grazing on Nov. 1, he and his family fled with their livestock to a neighboring state where grazing is allowed. Two of his sons died on the journey. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

Zainabu Hamayaji went to extreme lengths to protect her family from being abducted by Boko Haram. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

To Save Her Children, She Pretended To Be Crazy

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This young boy was kidnapped by Boko Haram. He managed to escape, spent months in a government barracks and now lives in a rehabilitation center. He is probably around 6 years old but doesn't know for sure. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

The Little Boy Who Escaped From Boko Haram

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A World Food Programme worker stands next to aid parcels that will be distributed to South Sudanese refugees at the airport in Sudan's North Kordofan state. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

Why It's So Hard To Stop The World's Looming Famines

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Uwani Musa Dure, 25, is one of the scores of mostly women and children who fled Gwoza and have recently returned. She now lives at a settlement for the displaced — and is searching for family members abducted by Boko Haram. Fati Abubakar/UNICEF hide caption

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Fati Abubakar/UNICEF

What It's Like To Come Home After Fleeing From Boko Haram

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Margaret Joseph sells grasshoppers to Ado Garba at her stall in the Maiduguri market. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

So What Does A Deep-Fried Grasshopper Taste Like?

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Aweofeso Adebola (in white shirt) and Ifeoluwa Ayomide (in cap) pose with some of their students. Zachariah Ibrahim, who dreams of being a pilot, stands behind the girl in the green hijab. Fatima Alidarunge, who wants to be a soldier to fight Boko Haram, is in the blue headgear. Linus Unah for NPR hide caption

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Linus Unah for NPR

Five-year-old Fatima shows off her Sallah gift in a camp for those internally displaced by the ongoing violence in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State in northeast Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

In Northeast Nigeria, Displaced Families Celebrate Ramadan's End In Style

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