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Trina. Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR

A young fan came to the Mumbai home of rapper Saniya Mistri Qayammuddin – aka Saniya MQ — to pay her respects and pose for a selfie. Raksha Kumar/NPR hide caption

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Raksha Kumar/NPR

The improbable fame of a hijab-wearing teen rapper from a poor neighborhood in Mumbai

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From left: Deng Ge is a rap mogul who became a lockdown activist. Poet Sally Wen Mao Mao uses her art to express her anger about how Chinese people are being portrayed in the pandemic. Writer and comic artist Laura Gao, living in the U.S., has a video chat with her grandmother Zhou Nai, who's happy to have a supply of mooncakes, a popular Chinese dessert. Image provided by Deng Ge; Yuri Hasegawa; and screen grab by Laura Gao. hide caption

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Image provided by Deng Ge; Yuri Hasegawa; and screen grab by Laura Gao.

Olutosin Oduwole at his home in New Jersey in 2016. Shankar Vedantam/NPR hide caption

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Shankar Vedantam/NPR

Rap on Trial: How An Aspiring Musician's Words Led To Prison Time

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Rapper Tupac Shakur arrives at New York's Radio City Music Hall on Sept. 4, 1996. Todd Plitt/AP hide caption

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Todd Plitt/AP

Episode 17: Why Do We Still Care About Tupac?

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