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A prototype of SpaceX's Starship stands at the company's Texas launch facility on Saturday. The Starship spacecraft is a massive vehicle designed to eventually be able to take people to the moon, Mars and beyond. Loren Elliott/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/Getty Images

The Crew Dragon landed safely in the Atlantic Ocean on Friday morning, with a splashdown at 8:45 a.m. ET, as scheduled. The uncrewed craft had been on a test flight in which it docked with the International Space Station. NASA TV Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NASA TV Screenshot by NPR

In this photo provided by NASA, the SpaceX Crew Dragon is pictured just beside the International Space Station. SpaceX's new crew capsule arrived at the station on Sunday in a remarkable moment for commercial space exploration. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

In this illustration, SpaceX's Crew Dragon approaches the International Space Station for docking. The capsule has room to carry seven astronauts. SpaceX/NASA hide caption

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SpaceX/NASA

SpaceX Readies For Key Test Of Capsule Built To Carry Astronauts Into Space

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SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk, left, shakes hands with Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa, right, on Monday, after announcing that he will be the first private passenger on a trip around the moon. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Companies such as Playboy and Space X have deleted their official Facebook pages amid the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The social media giant is losing more than just profiles: Its market value has decreased by $80 billion. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

A SpaceX Falcon9 rocket blasts off the launch pad in February 2015, carrying the NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft. The same type of rocket attempted to place a U.S. spy satellite in orbit on Sunday. Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images