Health Care Health Care
Stories About

Health Care

Dr. Eduardo Ibarra checks the blood pressure of Carmen Garcia Lavoy in the Toa Baja area of Puerto Rico. He's been making house calls in the area with nurse Erika Rodriguez. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Beaubien/NPR

Lingering Power Outage In Puerto Rico Strains Health Care System

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560853587/560920939" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Washington Post reports that President Trump, shown here with former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, personally intervened to delay approval of Iowa's waiver application. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump spoke from the White House in July in an effort to promote health overhaul legislation. He's now trying to make changes through an executive order. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
The Washington Post/Getty Images

Trump Says He'll Sign Order To Expand Health Insurance Options

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556841453/557198200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lori Wallace says it's frustrating to constantly hear messages in ads for hospitals that imply her cancer would go away if she were just more positive and tried harder. Sam Harnett/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Harnett/KQED

The Painful Side Of Positive Health Care Marketing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555370189/564443911" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Staying healthy and knowing how to find good health care is a big challenge for college freshmen leaving home for the first time. Mauro Grigollo/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

toggle caption
Mauro Grigollo/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Bernard Tyson, CEO of Kaiser Permanente, is optimistic about a bipartisan health bill. He cautions that partisanship will only lead to more insurance instability. Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Misha Friedman/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Kaiser Permanente CEO Says A Bipartisan Health Bill Is The Best Way Forward

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553836940/553918037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Canadian Doctor Explains How Her Country's Single-Payer Health Care System Works

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553336111/553336112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Tale Of 2 States: How California And Texas May Fare Under GOP Health Plan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/552623107/552708269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Lindsey Graham, second from left, speaks as Sen. John Barrasso, from left, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. John Thune and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell listen during a news briefing Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Jimmy Kimmel, seen hosting the Academy Awards in February, has been thrown into political hot waters. His name has been invoked by a GOP senator looking to pass an Obamacare repeal and replace bill. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. (right), and Rick Santorum, former senator from Pennsylvania, listen during a health reform news conference on Capitol Hill last week. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Dr. Ruth Berggren stands outside Charity Hospital in New Orleans in 2005, where she had earlier cared for patients during Hurricane Katrina. Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Cheryl Gerber/AP

Dr. Winston Watkins, an internist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Houston, volunteered to do a shift in the ER to give his colleagues a break. Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA

In A Houston Emergency Room, It Was A Week Like No Other

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547945860/548076123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript