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Malaria

HIV-positive patients and their families protest hospitals' lack of medicines and supplies in Caracas, Venezuela, in April 2018. Some patients are fleeing to neighboring countries like Peru in search of lifesaving anti-retroviral drugs. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

Freya, a springer spaniel, is in training to detect malaria parasites in sock samples taken from children in Gambia. Two canine cohorts were used in a study on malaria detection. Durham University/Medical Detection Dogs/London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine hide caption

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Durham University/Medical Detection Dogs/London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

This adult Anopheles gambiae mosquito — the kind that spreads malaria — was genetically modified as part of the study. Andrew Hammond hide caption

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Andrew Hammond

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria

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The prehensile tailed skink from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea has green blood due to high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin. The green bile pigment in the blood overwhelms the intense crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a striking lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU hide caption

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Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU

Why Do Some Lizards Have Green Blood?

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A mosquito's antenna responds to odors. Scientists are trying to figure out how the malaria parasite might trigger a change in body odor that draws in mosquitoes that carry the disease, like the Anopheles skeeter pictured above. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

An Anopheles mosquito — the only kind that can spread malaria — feeds on a human. On Monday, a 4-year-old girl died of the disease in Italy, where malaria was thought to have been eradicated. Sinclair Stammers/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

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Sinclair Stammers/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM

Malaria parasites, spread by a mosquito's bite, have started to adapt so the go-to drugs won't knock them out. Daniel Heuclin/Nature Picture Li/Getty Images/Nature Picture Libr hide caption

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Daniel Heuclin/Nature Picture Li/Getty Images/Nature Picture Libr

Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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After reaching adulthood, a mosquito emerges from the water looking for trouble. Courtesy of Andrew Hammond hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Hammond

To Fight Malaria, Scientists Try Genetic Engineering To Wipe Out Mosquitoes

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