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A blood transfusion bag hangs in an operating room in a hospital in the Republic of Congo. Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa have a huge gap between blood supply and demand, new research found. Godong/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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Godong/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Scientists use a microscope to see if the genetic modification is spreading. Immature modified mosquitoes glow red with yellow eyes when illuminated with a laser. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

In 2012, this mother carried her 5-year-old son to a malaria clinic in Thailand from Myanmar. Two new studies find that multidrug-resistant parasites are rendering front-line malaria drugs ineffective in Southeast Asia. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Study: Malaria Drugs Are Failing At An 'Alarming' Rate In Southeast Asia

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Sean McMinn/NPR

World's First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

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Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

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HIV-positive patients and their families protest hospitals' lack of medicines and supplies in Caracas, Venezuela, in April 2018. Some patients are fleeing to neighboring countries like Peru in search of lifesaving anti-retroviral drugs. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

Freya, a springer spaniel, is in training to detect malaria parasites in sock samples taken from children in Gambia. Two canine cohorts were used in a study on malaria detection. Durham University/Medical Detection Dogs/London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine hide caption

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Durham University/Medical Detection Dogs/London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

This adult Anopheles gambiae mosquito — the kind that spreads malaria — was genetically modified as part of the study. Andrew Hammond hide caption

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Andrew Hammond

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria

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The prehensile tailed skink from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea has green blood due to high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin. The green bile pigment in the blood overwhelms the intense crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a striking lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU hide caption

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Courtesy of Christopher C. Austin/LSU

Why Do Some Lizards Have Green Blood?

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