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Protective equipment is in short supply. Here, a Liberian burial team carefully disinfects its gloves before disposing of them. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Why Ebola Is Making It Harder To Provide Good Health Care

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A health worker cleans his hands with chlorinated water before entering an Ebola screening tent at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone. More than 300 Sierra Leoneans have died of the disease. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

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Michael Duff/AP

Even With $100 Million, WHO Says It Will Take Months To Control Ebola

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A man lies in a newly opened Ebola isolation center in a closed school in Monrovia, Liberia, on Thursday. The official death toll of 1,000 people in four countries is likely below the actual number, the World Health Organization says. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Miguel Pajares, a Spanish priest who was infected with the Ebola virus while working in Liberia, is transferred from a plane to an ambulance after arriving in Spain. He was treated with an experimental drug but died on the disease. Spanish Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

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Spanish Defense Ministry/AP

Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten

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AIDS drugs line a pharmacy's shelves. A new recommendation from the World Health Organization suggests a daily anti-HIV pill for men who have sex with men. Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov

On the outskirts of Islamabad, a Pakistani health worker vaccinates an Afghan refugee against polio. Muhammed Muheisen/AP hide caption

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Muhammed Muheisen/AP

The Comeback Of Polio Is A Public Health Emergency

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Testing for Ebola, a scientist in a mobile lab at Gueckedou, Guinea, separates blood cells from plasma cells to isolate the virus's genetic sequence. Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov

Many people like these Tibetans in Qinghai, China, rely on indoor stoves for heating and cooking. That causes serious health problems. Courtesy of One Earth Designs hide caption

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Courtesy of One Earth Designs

A child is immunized against polio at the health clinic in a farming village in northern Nigeria. The procedure involves pinching two drops of the vaccine into the child's mouth. For full protection, the child needs three doses, spaced out over time. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

How To Get Rid Of Polio For Good? There's A $5 Billion Plan

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