Mark Zuckerberg Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook says it disagrees with how The New York Times is presenting data-sharing deals it has used for at least 10 years. Here, a man reads security parameters on his phone in front of a Facebook logo in Bordeaux, southwestern France. Regis Duvignau/Reuters hide caption

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Regis Duvignau/Reuters

"Facebook is looking to know basically as much as possible about its users," Julia Angwin says. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facebook And Other Firms Have A Ton Of Data On You. Here's How To Limit That

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After Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg spoke to Congress about a massive data breach, the company announced it would no longer fund an effort to oppose The Consumer Right to Privacy Act. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

A laptop showing the Facebook logo is held alongside a Cambridge Analytica sign at the entrance to the London offices of Cambridge Analytica. The company's acting CEO, Alexander Tayler, is stepping down, and is the second CEO out since the data sharing scandal broke. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg prepares to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the U.S. Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

From right: Kent Walker, vice president and general counsel with Google Inc.; Colin Stretch, general counsel with Facebook Inc.; and Sean Edgett, acting general counsel with Twitter Inc., swear in to a House Intelligence Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 1, 2017. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO and founder of Facebook Inc., attends a conference in Idaho in July 2017. Zuckerberg has announced — and celebrated — a drop in the amount of time users are spending on Facebook. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg laughs as he meets with a group of entrepreneurs and innovators during a roundtable discussion at Cortex Innovation Community technology hub, in November, in St. Louis. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said connecting the world means bringing people together. But increasingly the platform is being used by some very powerful elements to sow divisions. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg's Big Blind Spot And The Conflict Within Facebook

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (right) speaks with panelists at the Facebook Communities Summit on Thursday in Chicago, where he announced Facebook's mission will change to focus on the activity level of its users. From left are Lola Omolola, Erin Schatteman and Janet Sanchez, who run popular Facebook groups. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP