CAlifornia CAlifornia

Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox speaks to supporters in San Diego on Tuesday. He advanced to the general election against Democrat Gavin Newsom, giving the GOP a foothold in a top statewide race. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Voters in Santa Clara County are deciding Tuesday whether to remove Judge Aaron Persky from office after he sentenced a former Stanford University swimmer convicted of sexual assault to a short jail sentence instead of prison. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Democrats running for the California 39th Congressional district, from left, Mai Khanh Tran, Sam Jammal and Andy Thorburn, speak to voters during a rally held by Swing Left at Carolyn Rosa Park in Rowland Heights, Calif., on May 19. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images

Paul Smith says he wanted "take a page from the Russian playbook" to influence a California congressional campaign. Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR hide caption

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Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR

Inspired By Russia, He Bought Influence On Facebook

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In California, an initiative expected on November's ballot would be one of the broadest online privacy regulations in the U.S. traffic_analyzer/Getty Images hide caption

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traffic_analyzer/Getty Images

Do Not Sell My Personal Information: California Eyes Data Privacy Measure

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Eric Risberg/AP

California Winemakers Nervous About U.S.-China Trade Talks

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Dan Diaz holds a photo of his late wife, Brittany Maynard, taken on their wedding day, during a rally calling for California Gov. Jerry Brown to sign right-to-die legislation at the Capitol in Sacramento in 2015. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A billboard above a gas station reads "Feel The Burn," a play on 2016 presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' campaign slogan, "Feel The Bern." It's actually promoting tests for sexually transmitted diseases. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Nick Ut/AP

Luminalt solar installers Pam Quan (right) and Walter Morales (left) install solar panels on a roof in San Francisco on Wednesday. The California Energy Commission approved a regulation that would require all new homes in the state to have solar panels. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Kelly Slater during team practice before the World Surf League's Founders' Cup of Surfing at his Surf Ranch in Lemoore, Calif. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Surfers Head Inland To Compete On Machine-Made California Waves

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Vehicles pass during the afternoon commute on Highway 101 in Los Angeles on April 2. California is suing the EPA over a plan to revise fuel efficiency standards for vehicles, weakening Obama-era limits on greenhouse gas emissions. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A box of food prepared at a food bank distribution in Petaluma, Calif. The state ranks near the bottom in enrolling people for food assistance. To change that, it's taking lessons from its robust Medi-Cal health insurance program, which targets much the same population. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

New Chinese tariffs will raise the price of many American crops, including almonds and other nuts. PM Images/Getty Images hide caption

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PM Images/Getty Images

What Chinese Tariffs Targeting American Crops Will Mean For Farmers

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Reacquired Volkswagen and Audi diesel cars sit in a desert graveyard near Victorville, Calif., on Wednesday. Volkswagen AG has paid more than $7.4 billion to buy back about 350,000 vehicles, the automaker said in a recent court filing. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

The city council in Los Alamitos, Calif., has given its preliminary approval to a measure exempting the city from a state law that limits cooperation between local police and federal immigration agents. Mayor Troy Edgar is seen here on Monday outside Los Alamitos City Hall. Amy Taxin/AP hide caption

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Amy Taxin/AP

Wendy Root Askew with her husband Dominick Askew and their son. When the little boy (now 6) was born, Root Askew struggled with postpartum depression. She likes California's bill, she says, because it goes beyond mandatory screening; it would also require insurers to establish programs to help women get treatment. Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew hide caption

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Courtesy of Wendy Root Askew

Lawmakers Weigh Pros And Cons Of Mandatory Screening For Postpartum Depression

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Scientists are finding that, just as with secondhand smoke from tobacco, inhaling secondhand smoke from marijuana can make it harder for arteries to expand to allow a healthy flow of blood. Maren Caruso/Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Caruso/Getty Images

Are There Risks From Secondhand Marijuana Smoke? Early Science Says Yes

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