Kazakhstan Kazakhstan
Stories About

Kazakhstan

The burned-out administrative building in Almaty, Kazakhstan's largest city, can be seen Friday. The country's president has rejected calls for talks with protesters after days of unprecedented unrest and vowed to destroy "armed bandits." Alexander Bogdanov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Bogdanov/AFP via Getty Images

In this photo taken from video, Russian peacekeepers board a Russian military plane at an airfield outside Moscow to fly to Kazakhstan on Thursday. A Russia-led military alliance, the Collective Security Treaty Organization, said early Thursday that it would send peacekeeper troops to Kazakhstan. Russian Defense Ministry Press Service/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Russian Defense Ministry Press Service/AP

New videos from Kazakhstan's tourism board turn the fictional journalist Borat's catchphrase "Very nice!" into a slogan to promote the Central Asian country. Kazakhstan Travel/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kazakhstan Travel/Screenshot by NPR

Police and rescuers work on the site of a plane crash near Almaty International Airport in Kazakhstan on Friday. A Bek Air flight crashed Friday shortly after takeoff, killing at least 12 people on board. Emergency Situations Ministry of the Republic of Kazakhstan via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Emergency Situations Ministry of the Republic of Kazakhstan via AP

Serikjan Bilash (left), co-founder of Atajurt, and wife Leila Adilzhan in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Per the terms of a plea deal, Bilash can't work in political activism for the next seven years, which includes calling out China's repression of Kazakhs. Emily Feng/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Feng/NPR

Aibota Zhanibek was born in China and now lives in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Members of her family, who are Muslim ethnic Kazakhs, have been detained in China's northwestern region of Xinjiang. Emily Feng/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Feng/NPR

'Illegal Superstition': China Jails Muslims For Practicing Islam, Relatives Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/764153179/768167031" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev says he will leave his post after nearly 30 years in office. He's seen here at the Akkorda Palace in Astana, Kazakhstan, in 2016. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

An ethnic Kazakh woman tried to cancel her Chinese citizenship after she married and moved to Kazakhstan. When she crossed back into China last year, the problems began. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nicole Xu for NPR

'They Ordered Me To Get An Abortion': A Chinese Woman's Ordeal In Xinjiang

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/669203831/669594276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Uighur security personnel patrol near the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar, a city in northwestern China's Xinjiang region, in 2017. Xinjiang authorities have detained members of the Uighur ethnic minority, who are largely Muslim, and held them in camps the authorities call "education and training centers." Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ng Han Guan/AP

Ex-Detainee Describes Torture In China's Xinjiang Re-Education Camp

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666287509/667285035" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kalida Akytkhan, pictured with her son Parkhat Rakhymbergen, has two sons and two daughter-in-laws who have been detained in re-education camps in Xinjiang. She brought photos of her family to the offices of rights organization Atazhurt in Almaty. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Schmitz/NPR

Families Of The Disappeared: A Search For Loved Ones Held In China's Xinjiang Region

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/665597190/666871000" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Russian resupply rocket launched Thursday morning from Kazakhstan. The flight initially went as planned, but the rocket broke up in the atmosphere about six minutes after it took off. NASA TV hide caption

toggle caption
NASA TV

LGBT activists in Kazakhstan hoped international attention from hosting the Winter Olympics might help their cause. Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters/Landov

For Kazakhstan's LGBT Community, A Struggle For Recognition And Rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/433450186/433544140" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Boosters of Kazakhstan's bid for the 2022 Winter Olympics rally in Almaty as they wait for word of whether their city won. It didn't, forcing Kazakhstan back to the drawing board for ways to achieve international recognition. Corey Flintoff/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Corey Flintoff/NPR

Some Kazakhs Celebrate The Loss Of The 2022 Winter Olympics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/428355181/428355182" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama, accompanied by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, speaks during their joint news conference at the conclusion of the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague on Tuesday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A column of Russian troops prepares to leave the checkpoint at a bridge over the Inguri River in Western Georgia, in October 2008, after securing the secession of Georgia's breakaway South Ossetia region. Levan Gabechava/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Levan Gabechava/Reuters/Landov