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In this photo provided by NASA, the SpaceX Crew Dragon is pictured just beside the International Space Station. SpaceX's new crew capsule arrived at the station on Sunday in a remarkable moment for commercial space exploration. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

In this illustration, SpaceX's Crew Dragon approaches the International Space Station for docking. The capsule has room to carry seven astronauts. SpaceX/NASA hide caption

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SpaceX/NASA

SpaceX Readies For Key Test Of Capsule Built To Carry Astronauts Into Space

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NASA astronaut Anne McClain, attends her final exam at the Gagarin Cosmonauts' Training Centre outside Moscow on Nov. 14, 2018. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

'Every Day Is A Good Day When You're Floating': Anne McClain Talks Life In Space

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NASA astronaut Anne McClain (from left), Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency successfully blasted into space on Monday morning. It is the first mission since an aborted launch in October. Kirill Kudryavtsev /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev /AFP/Getty Images

Smoke rises as first-stage boosters separate from a Soyuz rocket with a Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying a NASA astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut. The mission was aborted shortly after launch, and the pair returned to Earth safely in an emergency landing. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

A 2-millimeter hole was found last week in a Russian Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft (left) that is docked to the International Space Station. NASA/AP hide caption

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NASA/AP

Who Caused The Mysterious Leak At The International Space Station?

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Sunita Williams conducts routine maintenance during a stint aboard the International Space Station. Nowadays, the astronaut helps Boeing and SpaceX develop private spacecraft. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A NASA Astronaut Stays In Orbit With SpaceX And Boeing

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Norishige Kanai prior the launch of the Soyuz-FG rocket in Kazakhstan on Dec. 17. As is the norm, the Japanese astronaut grew in outer space, just not by as much as he initially thought. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, (bottom); Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai, middle; and U.S. astronaut Scott Tingle, above; wave prior to the launch of the Soyuz-FG rocket at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sunday. Shamil Zhumatov/AP hide caption

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Shamil Zhumatov/AP

The unmanned Antares rocket launched from Wallops Island, Va., on Sunday, carrying with it a Cygnus capsule containing some 7,400 pounds of supplies for astronauts at the International Space Station. Bill Ingalls/NASA/NASA via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/NASA/NASA via Getty Images

In this photo taken by Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, the SpaceX Dragon capsule arrives at the International Space Station on Wednesday, stocked with scientific equipment, supplies — and ice cream. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

The Best Item In An Astronaut's Care Package? Definitely The Ice Cream

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"It's not just about making one German astronaut happy with fresh bread," Marcu explains. "There's really a deeper meaning to bread in space." Above, a photo illustration of bread in space. NASA/ Bake in Space GmbH hide caption

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NASA/ Bake in Space GmbH

Flight engineer Kate Rubins checks out the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, which is attached to the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

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NASA

After A Year In Space, The Air Hasn't Gone Out Of NASA's Inflated Module

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NASA astronaut Kate Rubins floats in the International Space Station in September 2016, wearing a spacesuit decorated by patients recovering at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. NASA Johnson/Flickr hide caption

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NASA Johnson/Flickr

A Microbe Hunter Plies Her Trade In Space

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Trent Barton, a volunteer for the study looking at pressure inside the brain during space flights. Courtesy of David Ham hide caption

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Courtesy of David Ham

Doctor Launches Vision Quest To Help Astronauts' Eyeballs

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