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Espionage Act

Prosecutor Eva-Marie Persson comments on the court's decision not to detain WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange during a news conference Monday in Uppsala, Sweden. Fredrik Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fredrik Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images

Reality Winner leaves the Augusta Courthouse on June 8, 2017, in Augusta, Ga. Winner, a former intelligence industry contractor, pleaded guilty to leaking National Security Agency documents. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Reporters wait in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on June 23, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Opinion: Calling The Press The Enemy Of The People Is A Menacing Move

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Reality Winner, shown exiting the Augusta Courthouse on June 8, 2017, has pleaded guilty to violating the Espionage Act. She was an intelligence industry contractor accused of leaking National Security Agency documents to a news site. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg attend their 1951 trial in New York. They were charged and convicted of giving nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union under the 1917 Espionage Act. The law was intended for spies but has been used by the Obama and Trump administrations to prosecute suspected national security leakers. AP hide caption

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AP

Once Reserved For Spies, Espionage Act Now Used Against Suspected Leakers

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