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NASA engineers on the flight team celebrate the InSight spacecraft's successful landing on Mars at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., on Monday. Al Seib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Seib/AFP/Getty Images

NASA Probe Lands Safely On Martian Surface

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This is the south polar cap of Mars as it appeared to the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor on April 17, 2000. An underground lake was found near here. NASA/JPL/MSSS, hide caption

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NASA/JPL/MSSS,

Underground Lake Found On Mars Beneath A Mile Of Ice

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A dust storm has reduced sunlight and visibility on Mars. But NASA's Curiosity rover, seen in a self-portrait taken last week in the Gale Crater, runs on nuclear energy and is powering through. NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP

These two views from NASA's Curiosity rover, acquired specifically to measure the amount of dust inside Gale Crater, show that dust has increased over three days from a major Martian dust storm. The left-hand image shows a view of the east-northeast rim of Gale Crater on June 7, 2018 (Sol 2074); the right-hand image shows a view of the same feature on June 10, 2018 (Sol 2077). NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Enormous Dust Storm On Mars Threatens The Opportunity Rover

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Two rock samples taken by NASA's Curiosity rover were found to contain organic molecules. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Chemical Building Blocks For Life On Mars

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The Atlas V rocket carrying the Mars InSight lander launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base, as seen from the San Gabriel Mountains more than 100 miles away, on Saturday morning. The InSight probe is the first NASA lander designed entirely to study the deep interior structure of Mars. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

An artist's rendition of NASA's InSight lander, which is expected to launch on Saturday morning. InSight will monitor the Red Planet's seismic activity and internal temperature. NASA/JPL-CalTech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-CalTech

NASA Is Heading Back To Mars To Peer Inside The Red Planet

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This artist's-concept illustration depicts NASA's Psyche spacecraft which will carry a deep-space laser communications system. JPL-Caltech/Arizona State Univ./Space Systems Loral/Peter Rubin/NASA hide caption

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JPL-Caltech/Arizona State Univ./Space Systems Loral/Peter Rubin/NASA

Live High Definition Video From Mars? NASA Is Getting Ready

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The goals of the planetary protection officer are to protect the Earth and to protect other planets from being contaminated by substances from Earth during exploration. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Do You Have What It Takes To Be NASA's Next Planetary Protection Officer?

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Crew members on one of the simulated Mars missions this spring included Pitchayapa Jingjit (from left), Becky Parker, Elijah Espinoza and Esteban Ramirez. Community college students and teachers in real life, the team members spent a week in the Utah desert, partly to experience the isolation and challenges of a real trip to Mars. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah's Desert

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