Federal Communications Commission Federal Communications Commission

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has unveiled his plan to undo the 2015 "net neutrality" rules that had placed Internet providers under the strictest-ever regulatory oversight. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The FCC's Move To Repeal Net Neutrality Rules, Explained

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Telemarketers are prohibited from making prerecorded phone calls to people without prior consent. It's also illegal to deliberately falsify caller ID with the intent to harm or defraud consumers. PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStock hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStock

The Blue Alert, a new kind of public emergency notification was named after two New York Police Department officers, Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, who were killed in an ambush attack by a man who hours earlier had shot a woman near Baltimore. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Republicans in Congress are no fans of FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler's "net neutrality" plan. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

On Net Neutrality, Republicans Pitch Oversight Rather Than Regulation

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Randall Stephenson, chairman and CEO of AT&T, introduces President Obama before the latter's remarks Dec. 3 at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable, a group Stephenson chairs. Stephenson has said that increasing regulation of the broadband industry — as proposed by the president — would have a substantial chilling effect on its investment in infrastructure. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Would FCC Plan Harm Telecom Investment? Even Industry Opinion Is Mixed

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Slow-loading messages will appear on some of your favorite sites Wednesday as part of a protest for net neutrality. But the sites won't actually be loading slower — the banners will be displayed just to make a point. iStockphoto hide caption

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