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Brazil's President Michel Temer has ordered that the military take over security issues in Rio de Janeiro. Leo Correa/AP hide caption

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Leo Correa/AP

The Racket In Brazil: Gangs Are Blowing Up Banks For Cash

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Revelers celebrate during the Carnival street parade of the Bloco das Carmelitas in the Santa Teresa neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, last week. Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mauro Pimentel/AFP/Getty Images

Rio Carnival: When Brazil Lets Out Its Mysterious 'Inner Chicken'

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Maracanã Stadium's turf is dry, worn and filled with ruts and holes. Those soccer clubs that call the stadium home plan to meet and discuss how to bring Maracanã up to game-worthy shape. The question is, who will pay for the repairs? Nacho Doce/Reuters hide caption

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Nacho Doce/Reuters

Guide Wesley Williams (left) lines up blind long jumper and sprinter Lex Gillette on the track before making a long jump during practice at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in San Diego. Gillette started losing his sight when he was 8 years old. Bill Wechter for NPR hide caption

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Bill Wechter for NPR

For Blind Long Jumper At Paralympics, Success Depends On Teamwork

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Lucia Cabral peers through a bullet hole in her door in the Alemao favela complex. Like people everywhere, she checks her phone soon after she wakes up in the morning. In these favelas, she says, it's a matter of life or death. Joao Velozo for NPR hide caption

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Joao Velozo for NPR

Far From Olympics, Violence Rises In Rio's Poorest Neighborhoods

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Cleaners in Rio de Janeiro collect debris from Guanabara Bay that washed up onto the beach last December. The bay, which will host sailing events at the Olympics in August, is heavily polluted. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

For Olympic Sailors And Fishermen Alike, Rio's Dirty Bay Sets Off Alarms

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Jason Pryor is the only U.S. men's epee fencer competing at the Olympics in Rio. He is currently ranked 38th in the world. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

'A Fantasy Of A Fantasy': U.S. Fencer Jason Pryor On Reaching The Olympics

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Zulema Arenas #548 of Peru competes in the women's 3000 meter steeplechase during the Ibero American Athletics Championships - Aquece Rio Test Event for the Rio 2016 Olympics at Olympic Stadium on May 14, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro. Matthew Stockman/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Stockman/Getty Images

Does The Olympics In Rio Put The World In Danger Of Zika?

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A man performs yoga in the Babilonia favela overlooking Rio de Janeiro in 2014. The Brazilian government made a big push to impose order on the shantytowns in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics this summer. Babilonia was once considered a model, but violence has been on the rise in the run-up to the games. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro performs with the Vila Isabel Samba School during Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. André Vieira for NPR hide caption

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André Vieira for NPR

In Rio, The Samba Parade Goes On Despite A Wardrobe Malfunction

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The Rodrigo de Freitas lake, which was largely cleaned up in recent years, was thought to be safe for Olympic rowers and canoeists. But an investigation by The Associated Press found it to be among the most polluted sites. Leo Correa/AP hide caption

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Leo Correa/AP

Expats Find Brazil's Reputation For Race-Blindness Is Undone By Reality

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