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A highway webcam shows a snowy portion of U.S. Highway 89 near Pendroy, Mont., on Monday morning after a record-setting winter storm dumped snow on the northern Rockies. Montana Department of Transportation hide caption

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Montana Department of Transportation

People in Houston navigate the floodwaters on Thursday. The city got more than 9 inches of rain on that day alone, according to the National Weather Service in Houston. Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Parts of eastern Texas could see nearly 3 feet of rain through Friday, forecasters say, warning of potential flash floods from Tropical Depression Imelda. Here, Angel Marshman walks through floodwaters in Galveston after trying to start his flooded car Wednesday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is under the microscope for reportedly pressuring government scientists to back President Trump over a misleading tweet about Hurricane Dorian. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Wilbur Ross At The Center Of Another Political Storm, This Time About The Weather

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Acting NOAA head Neil Jacobs, seen here at far right as President Trump watches a briefing on Hurricane Dorian, is defending his agency's response to Trump's claim that Dorian had been predicted to hit Alabama hard. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

NOAA Head: 'No One's Job Is Under Threat' Over Trump's Disputed Tweets About Alabama

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A comparison of how the old and upgraded U.S. global weather forecast models predicted the "bomb cyclone" that hit the Northeast U.S. in January 2018. The old NOAA model (left) estimated a smaller amount of snowfall than what actually happened (right). The updated model (middle) was more accurate. NOAA/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NOAA/Screenshot by NPR

Blizzard warnings have been issued for the Rockies and Plains areas, where a second bomb cyclone is predicted. Here, a man uses a bulldozer to clear snow in Limon, Colo., that was left by a bomb cyclone that swept across much of the state last month. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images

A massive late winter storm is bringing blizzard conditions to a number of central U.S. states Thursday. In affected areas, many agencies are shutting down and urging people to stay off the roads. NASA/NOAA GOES Project hide caption

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NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Lake Elsinore, Calif., was drenched Thursday by a storm that dropped rain and snow across much of the state. The National Weather Service is providing forecasts and warnings as usual, but employees are working without pay. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Back-To-Back Storms And No Pay For Federal Weather Forecasters

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