Weather Weather

A fan dressed as Santa gestures in the snow during a game between the Chicago Bears and the Cleveland Browns in Chicago on Sunday. The storm system that brought Christmas Eve snow to Chicago is now passing over the Northeast. David Banks/Getty Images hide caption

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David Banks/Getty Images

Nancy and Christian Schneider live in the Holly Lake Mobile Home park, where they haven't had electricity in their home since Hurricane Irma struck Florida over a week ago. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

An image of Western Hemisphere lightning storms, captured Feb. 14 over the course of one hour. Brighter colors indicate more lightning energy was recorded (the key is in kilowatt-hours of total optical emissions from lightning.) The most powerful storm system is located over the Gulf Coast of Texas. MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A woman walks in whiteout conditions in Boston on Thursday. Sunday's forecast promises similarly daunting conditions, as a winter storm bears down on the Northeast. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

A composite image of Earth taken at 1:07 p.m. ET on Jan. 15 by the GOES-16 satellite. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A man clears the debris from a destroyed convenience store in Rosalie, Ala., on Thursday, the day after a reported tornado struck the area. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Tornado Outbreaks Are On The Rise, And Scientists Don't Know Why

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A map from the National Weather Service shows tornado reports (red T), wind reports (blue W) and hail reports (green H) for Tuesday. More than 20 tornadoes were reported as a powerful storm system moved through the Southeast. Zoom in on the map here. National Weather Service/Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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National Weather Service/Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

People bike on the beach ahead of Hurricane Matthew in Atlantic Beach, Fla., on Wednesday. Droves of people in the U.S. have begun evacuating coastal areas ahead of the storm, which tracked a deadly path through the Caribbean in a maelstrom of wind, mud and water. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

A satellite image shows Tropical Storm Hermine forming in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday. The storm is expected to make landfall north of Tampa late Thursday night or early Friday morning, the National Hurricane Center says. NASA/NOAA GOES Project hide caption

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NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Alejandra Ventura lifts her dog out of the water after the Brazos River topped its banks and flooded a mobile home park in Richmond, Texas, on Tuesday. Daniel Kramer/Reuters hide caption

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Daniel Kramer/Reuters

Inundated With Rain, Texas Residents Brace For More This Week

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Rwanda is known as "le pays des milles collines" €-- the land of a thousand hills. Weather varies by altitude; for farmers, detailed forecasts can make a huge difference. Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society hide caption

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Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society

Turns Out You Do Need A Weatherman To Know Which Way The Wind Blew

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