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California flooding

A worker from the Coachella Valley Water Department surveys debris flowing across a road following heavy rains from Tropical Storm Hilary, in Rancho Mirage, Calif., on Monday. David Swanson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David Swanson/AFP via Getty Images

The melt of California's massive snowpack has led to chronic flooding in the Central Valley this spring, like this riverfront park near the town of Grayson. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

Pipes direct water into an irrigation project held by the University of California. After a few decades of not enough water California water officials are scrambling to catch as much of this year's floodwaters as they can. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In California's Central Valley, a long-disappeared lake has been resurrected. A power line dangles precariously over the edge of the water now filling the Tulare Lake Basin, and a building on the horizon is caught in the middle of the flood. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

California's epic snowpack is melting. Here's what to expect

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Biologists are evacuating endangered riparian brush rabbits as floodwaters rise in California. Lee Eastman/FWS hide caption

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Lee Eastman/FWS

The latest to be evacuated from California's floods? Bunnies

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Sibley Street, along with other residential roads were closed due to flooding from recent rain storms resulting in high water levels in Willow Creek, in Folsom, California. Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources

California's flooding reveals we're still building cities for the climate of the past

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Roads and infrastructure are increasing being overwhelmed by heavier rainfall, like the California Central Valley town of Planada in January. Most states still aren't designing water systems for heavier storms. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Federal climate forecasts could help prepare for extreme rain. But it's years away

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Most reservoirs aren't allowed to fill up in the winter, but Folsom Reservoir outside of Sacramento, California is using a new strategy to save more water by using weather forecasts. Ken James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Ken James/California Department of Water Resources

Heavy rain is still hitting California. A few reservoirs figured out how to capture more for drought

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Local resident Fidel Osorio rescues a dog from a flooded home in Merced, California, on Tuesday. Relentless storms were ravaging California again Tuesday. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

More than 300 fires broke out in Northern California over the past week, leaving residents like Danielle Bryant waiting for updates and a change in the weather. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

For Some California Residents, Latest Wildfires Are A Tipping Point

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A playground sits underwater in a flooded neighborhood in Guerneville, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Floods Turn Northern California Towns Into Islands: 'Our World Is Getting Smaller'

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Almost 200,000 people were ordered to evacuate after a hole in the emergency spillway in Northern California's Oroville Dam threatened to flood the surrounding area. Climate change could be a factor of extreme flooding in California. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

With Climate Change, California Is Likely To See More Extreme Flooding

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