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England forward Lauren James steps on Nigeria defender Michelle Alozie during their match in Brisbane, Australia, earning a red card. Patrick Hamilton/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Hamilton/AFP via Getty Images

Iraqis raise copies of the Quran, Muslims' holy book, during a protest in Baghdad, Saturday. Hundreds of protesters attempted to storm Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone, which houses foreign embassies and the seat of Iraq's government, following reports of the burning of a Quran by a ultranationalist group in front of the Iraqi Embassy in Copenhagen. Hadi Mizban/AP hide caption

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Hadi Mizban/AP

Protesters gather in Baghdad's Tahrir Square, carrying Iraqi flags and images of influential Iraqi Shiite cleric and political leader Muqtada al-Sadr, on Saturday following reports of the burning of a Quran carried out by a ultranationalist group in front of the Iraqi Embassy in Copenhagen. Ali Jabar/AP hide caption

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Ali Jabar/AP

Chefs prepare food at Mexico's Dinner With Enrique Olvera And Jordi Roca during Food Network & Cooking Channel New York City Wine & Food Festival presented By FOOD & WINE at Cosme NYC on October 15, 2015 in New York City. Cosme is one of six U.S. honorees on the 2021 list of the world's 50 best restaurants. Mike Pont/Getty Images for NYCWFF hide caption

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Mike Pont/Getty Images for NYCWFF

A cassette with the recording of teenage journalists' 1970 interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, along with polaroid photos from the conversation, seen at Bruun Rasmussen Auction House in Copenhagen on September 24, 2021. An unidentified bidder won the lot for the equivalent of $58,240. Ida Marie Odgaard/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ida Marie Odgaard/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Danish health authorities announced Wednesday that the country will continue its COVID-19 vaccine rollout without the shot made by AstraZeneca, citing its possible link to rare blood clotting events, the availability of other vaccines and the "fact that the COVID-19 epidemic in Denmark is currently under control." Dirk Waem/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dirk Waem/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images

Heba Alrejleh and Radwan Jomaa with children Aya, 11, Lilian, 4, and Mohamed, 10. "The words 'to send us back to Syria' means to destroy our lives," says Jomaa. Sidsel Overgaard hide caption

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Sidsel Overgaard

In Denmark, Fears Grow Among Syrian Asylum-Seekers As Residence Permits Are Revoked

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Police officers search addresses in Holbaek, Denmark, on Feb. 6. Denmark's intelligence service said it detained 13 people over a suspected terror plot, with another person arrested in Germany in a "linked" case. presse-fotos.dk/Ritzau via AP hide caption

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presse-fotos.dk/Ritzau via AP

Mogens Jensen, seen here in 2014, has stepped down as Denmark's agriculture minister due to mishandling a cull of the Danish mink population. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Minks look out from a cage after a farm near Naestved, Denmark, was told to kill off its herd Friday. Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Ima hide caption

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Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Ima

A mink is photographed on a farm in October in Hjoerring, Denmark. The country will cull its population of minks after discovering coronavirus outbreaks. Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

A police marksman and his dog observes convicted killer Peter Madsen threatening police with detonating a bomb while attempting to break out of jail Tuesday in Albertslund, Denmark. Nils Meilvang/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nils Meilvang/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

After it became clear that his neighborhood would be targeted as part of a sweeping plan to rid the country of immigrant-heavy areas officially designated as "ghettos," Asif Mehmood and 11 of his neighbors filed a lawsuit against the Danish government. Sidsel Overgaard/NPR hide caption

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Sidsel Overgaard/NPR

Facing Eviction, Residents Of Denmark's 'Ghettos' Are Suing The Government

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Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen, shown here in Brussels in February, has postponed her wedding due to a European Council meeting. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

People walk in Frederiksberg Gardens in Copenhagen, Denmark, on March 28. Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Davali/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Narsaq, a town of 1,200 in southern Greenland, sits near the Kvanefjeld project, one of two major rare earth mineral deposits in Greenland. The Arctic island has a wealth of rare earth resources that the U.S. has labeled as essential to national defense. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Greenland Is Not For Sale. But It Has Rare Earth Minerals America Wants

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Brondby fans scuffle with police during a match between the Copenhagen and Brondby soccer teams at Copenhagen's Telia Parken stadium in 2017. Lars Ronbog/FrontzoneSport via Getty Images hide caption

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Lars Ronbog/FrontzoneSport via Getty Images

A Soccer Team In Denmark Is Using Facial Recognition To Stop Unruly Fans

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President Trump speaks with reporters before boarding Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport in Morristown, N.J., on Sunday. Among the topics was Trump's interest in buying Greenland from Denmark. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP