Denmark Denmark

Peter Madsen's private submarine sits on a pier in Copenhagen's harbor. Danish police have identified a headless, limbless torso that washed ashore Monday as that of Kim Wall, the journalist who joined Madsen on his sub earlier this month to report a story. Jens Dresling/AP hide caption

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Jens Dresling/AP

Two wolves, as caught in night-vision footage by a game camera in West Jutland, Denmark. Scientists say that since 2012, they have confirmed at least five different wild wolves in the country — four males and one female. Courtesy of Natural History Museum Aarhus hide caption

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Courtesy of Natural History Museum Aarhus

Der ligger en lille ø midt i den gamle havn i Kangeq. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

Lyt til Anda Poulsen og Nuuk Trommedansere.

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The Old Town Museum in Aarhus, Denmark has created a "House of Memories" that's an exact replica of a 1950s apartment. It's intended for Alzheimer's patients, whose memories may be triggered by the sights, sounds and smells from the period, researchers say. Courtesy of Old Town Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Old Town Museum

Denmark's 'House Of Memories' Re-Creates 1950s For Alzheimer's Patients

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The Martyr Museum in Denmark includes exhibits on recent terrorist attacks. There are large portraits of two brothers who carried out suicide bombing attacks in Brussels in March, Ibrahim and Khalid el-Bakraoui. There are also "reconstructed artifacts" like nails that were used for shrapnel in the attack. Ida Grarup/Martyr Museum hide caption

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Ida Grarup/Martyr Museum

Denmark's 'Martyr Museum' Places Socrates And Suicide Bombers Side-By-Side

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The picturesque town of Odense — the birthplace of Hans Christian Andersen — is one of the Danish cities battling ISIS and its recruitment efforts. Denmark has one of the worst radicalization problems in Europe. Joao Alves/Flickr hide caption

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Joao Alves/Flickr

To Stop Kids From Radicalizing, Moms In Denmark Call Other Moms

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A Danish policeman checks passengers' identity papers on a train arriving from Germany on Jan. 6. Officials say the small country is overwhelmed by the number of refugees seeking asylum. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Denmark's Mixed Message For Refugees

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Danish police conduct spot checks on incoming traffic from Germany at a highway border crossing near Padborg, Denmark, on Jan. 6. Officials say they've been overwhelmed by the 20,000 asylum seekers who came to Denmark last year. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Denmark Wants To Become 'A Little Bit Less Attractive' To Refugees

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Photographers take pictures of the lion carcass before it's publicly dissected at Odense Zoo in Denmark. It was the zoo's second public dissection of a lion in four months. Sidsel Overgaard for NPR hide caption

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Sidsel Overgaard for NPR

Danes Say Zoo Dissections Fit With Country's 'Very Honest' Parenting

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Migrants, mostly from Syria and Iraq, set out on foot along a highway on the Danish-German border, heading north to Sweden on Wednesday. They arrived that morning on a train from Germany. CLAUS FISKER/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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CLAUS FISKER/AFP/Getty Images

Migrants Enter Denmark, Determined To Reach Sweden

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