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Workers makes shoes at a factory in Jinjiang, in southeast China's Fujian province. Nearly all shoes sold in the U.S. are foreign-made. China's share has declined, but it's still a major source. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Why The American Shoe Disappeared And Why It's So Hard To Bring It Back

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An F-150 pickup is assembled at a Ford plant in Dearborn, Mich., last year. Manufacturing has been a soft spot in recent months. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Hiring Slows Amid Trade Tensions, With Only 75,000 Jobs Added In May

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Betty Fernandez of Macy's department store speaks with a potential applicant about job openings during a job fair in Miami on April 5. Employers added far more jobs than expected in April — another sign the U.S. economy is chugging along as the expansion nears the 10-year mark. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Unemployment Drops To 3.6%, 263,000 Jobs Added, Showing Economy Remains Strong

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Rockland Industries employs about 240 people, including Kim Fisk (left) and Mitchell Sapp, who work at the textile company's manufacturing plant in Bamberg, S.C. Courtesy of Rockland Industries hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockland Industries

Deb Eisenhawer assembles a switch for a washing machine at a Whirlpool plant in Clyde, Ohio. The company's CEO says steel costs have reached "unexplainable levels." Aaron Josefczyk/Reuters hide caption

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Aaron Josefczyk/Reuters

From Mills To Manufacturers, Steel Tariffs Produce Winners And Losers

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Harley-Davidson motorcycle engines are assembled at the company's plant in Menomonee Falls, Wis. Tariffs from the European Union are prompting the company to shift production of some motorcycles for the European market overseas. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Trump Urges Harley-Davidson Not To Shift More Production Overseas

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The finished edge of a saw blade produced by Simonds International in Big Rapids, Mich. The blades require steel not available from U.S. mills. Aaron Selbig/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

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Aaron Selbig/Interlochen Public Radio

As U.S. Steelmakers Cheer Tariffs, A Michigan Factory's Future Looks Bleak

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A worker builds an aircraft engine at Honeywell Aerospace in Phoenix in 2016. Aerospace is among the manufacturing sectors that could be affected by import tariffs on steel and aluminum. Alwyn Scott/Reuters hide caption

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Alwyn Scott/Reuters

Trump Trade Action Could Boost Steel, Aluminum Manufacturers, Hurt Other Industries

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Yvonne Schmittenberg holds a tray of weld nuts produced by Schmittenberg Metal Works. They're used in the automotive industry. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

How Germany Wins At Manufacturing — For Now

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President Donald Trump speaks alongside White House senior adviser Jared Kushner (from left), Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier and Ford CEO Mark Fields during a meeting with manufacturing CEOs at the White House on Feb. 23. Trump disbanded two business advisory councils in August. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Faced with a string of resignations from his advisory panels, President Trump has disbanded two groups he had formed to provide policy and economic guidance. He's seen here after a news conference Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence stop to looks at a Caterpillar truck, manufactured in Illinois, on the South Lawn of the White House on Monday during a "Made in America" product showcase. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A factory worker in Jackson, Minn., uses Google Glass on the assembly line. Courtesy of AGCO hide caption

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Courtesy of AGCO

Google Glass Didn't Disappear. You Can Find It On The Factory Floor

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President-elect Donald Trump tours the Carrier Corp. in Indianapolis following the company's announcement it would keep hundreds of manufacturing jobs in the United States rather than move them to Mexico. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

U.S. Manufacturers Brace For Trump's Next Trade Targets

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President-elect Donald Trump greets attendees after speaking during an event at Carrier Corp. in Indianapolis on Thursday. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Students leave school at the end of the day at the Global Impact STEM Academy. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

A City Looks To STEM School To Lift Economy, But Will Grads Stay?

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Kids bike on Selma Road in Springfield, Ohio. "Springfield is a rather typical small city that has grown poorer over the years," former mayor Roger Baker says. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Springfield, Ohio: A Shrinking City Faces A Tough Economic Future

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Brazlian jet maker Embraer employs about 600 people in Melbourne, Fla., and is expanding. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

With Shuttles Gone, Private Ventures Give Florida's Space Coast A Lift

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This prototype built by MIT researchers can be reconfigured to manufacture different types of pharmaceuticals. Courtesy of the Allan Myerson lab hide caption

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Courtesy of the Allan Myerson lab

Inventing A Machine That Spits Out Drugs In A Whole New Way

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An engine is assembled at a Cummins plant in Columbus, Ind., in 2007. The Fortune 500 company sells diesel engines around the world. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

As Factory Jobs Slip Away, Indiana Voters Have Trade On Their Minds

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