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An artist's rendering shows a needle-like carbon nanotube delivering DNA through the wall of a plant cell. It also may be possible to use this method to inject a gene editing tool called CRISPR to alter a plant's characteristics for breeding. Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry hide caption

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Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants

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Seven-year-old Carson Miller (left), and his brother, 5-year-old Chase Miller (right), both have a degenerative brain disease called MEPAN syndrome. There are only 13 people in the world who have it. Courtesy of Andrew Ross-Perry hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Ross-Perry

Medical Detectives: The Last Hope For Families Coping With Rare Diseases

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DNA sleuthing helped identify Joseph James DeAngelo, the suspected East Area Rapist, who was arraigned in a Sacramento, Calif., courtroom in April. Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns

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Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) rangers display ivory seized from poachers around the country. KWS has played a critical role in carrying out operations against poachers. Simon Maina/Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Maina/Getty Images

DNA Test Helps Conservationists Track Down Ivory Smugglers

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The South Pool of New York's 9/11 Memorial, which honors victims of the attacks. On Wednesday, the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, announced it identified the remains of Scott Michael Johnson, a 26-year-old securities analyst. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

In these two two-cell mouse embryos, the surface of the embryos is outlined in orange, the DNA in the nucleus is indicated in blue and the activity of the LINE-1 gene is indicated via bright red spots. Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF hide caption

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Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF

Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo Development

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Elation is an Angus bull that recently sold for $800,000. His co-owner, Brian Bell, sells Elation's semen for $50 a sample, about double the going rate. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Joseph James DeAngelo, who authorities suspect is the so-called Golden State Killer responsible for at least a dozen murders, is arraigned in Sacramento, Calif., on Friday. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Joseph James DeAngelo, a suspect in a series of killings in California, was arrested Tuesday. Sacramento County, Calif., Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Sacramento County, Calif., Sheriff's Office via AP

Colored transmission electron micrograph of a section through an Escherichia coli bacterium. This rod-shaped bacterium moves via its hair-like flagellae (yellow). Kwangshin Kim/Science Source hide caption

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Kwangshin Kim/Science Source

What scientists believe to be our oldest ancestor, the single-celled organism named LUCA, likely lived in extreme conditions where magma met water — in a setting similar to this one from Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images hide caption

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Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images
Jenn Liv for NPR

Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

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Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Volunteer Greg Ruegsegger is outfitted with monitors, a catheter threaded into a vein and a mask to capture his breath in an experiment run by Joyner to measure human performance. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health?

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