DNA DNA

Joseph James DeAngelo, who authorities suspect is the so-called Golden State Killer responsible for at least a dozen murders, is arraigned in Sacramento, Calif., on Friday. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Joseph James DeAngelo, a suspect in a series of killings in California, was arrested Tuesday. Sacramento County, Calif., Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Sacramento County, Calif., Sheriff's Office via AP

Colored transmission electron micrograph of a section through an Escherichia coli bacterium. This rod-shaped bacterium moves via its hair-like flagellae (yellow). Kwangshin Kim/Science Source hide caption

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Kwangshin Kim/Science Source

What scientists believe to be our oldest ancestor, the single-celled organism named LUCA, likely lived in extreme conditions where magma met water — in a setting similar to this one from Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images hide caption

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Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images
Jenn Liv for NPR

Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

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Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Volunteer Greg Ruegsegger is outfitted with monitors, a catheter threaded into a vein and a mask to capture his breath in an experiment run by Joyner to measure human performance. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health?

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Benjamine Spencer was 22 years old in 1987 when he was arrested for murder. He was newly married, and expecting his first child. Cooper Neill for NPR hide caption

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Cooper Neill for NPR

Why A Man Declared Innocent Can't Get Out Of Prison

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Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

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Martha (right), the last known passenger pigeon, died in 1914. Her preserved body is now on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Why Did The Passenger Pigeon Go Extinct? The Answer Might Lie In Their Toes

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Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

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Christina Chung for NPR

When 'Where Are You From?' Takes You Someplace Unexpected

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The first sign of successful in vitro fertilization, after co-injection of a gene-correcting enzyme and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Courtesy of OHSU hide caption

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Courtesy of OHSU

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene

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Mitochondrial diseases can be passed from mothers to their children in DNA. JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images