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Antonin Scalia

President Trump awards the Presidential Medal of Freedom to American Football hall-of-famer Alan Page at the White House on Friday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Viva Las Vegas: Elvis, Adelson Honored With Presidential Medal Of Freedom

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In this June 1, 2017 file photo Supreme Court Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch is seen during an official group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Justice Neil Gorsuch Votes 100 Percent Of The Time With Most Conservative Colleague

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Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch (center) arrives with former New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte on Capitol Hill last week for a meeting with Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. There are different kinds of conservative judges, from the pragmatist to the originalist. Gorsuch is a self-proclaimed originalist. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Judge Gorsuch's Originalism Contrasts With Mentor's Pragmatism

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Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch faces members of the media while meeting with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., in his Senate office. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump's Supreme Court Pick Is A Disciple Of Scalia's 'Originalist' Crusade

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A plan to rename George Mason University's law school for late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia (center) has been tweaked after the first name that was chosen sparked jokes on social media. Scalia is seen here with his fellow justices in 2009. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama introduces Merrick Garland as his Supreme Court nominee Wednesday at the White House. Garland, 63, is currently chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

The casket containing the body of the late Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia leaves the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington following funeral mass services on Saturday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama look at a portrait of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia after paying their respects in the Great Hall of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Aude Guerrucci/Getty Images hide caption

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Aude Guerrucci/Getty Images

Peers, The President And Many Average Americans Pay Respects To Scalia

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U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justices Sandra Day O'Connor, center, and Antonin Scalia, right, watch as pallbearers carry the casket of Chief Justice William Rehnquest into the Supreme Court where he will laid in repose in September 2005. Chuck Kennedy/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Chuck Kennedy/MCT via Getty Images

Activists with People For the American Way demonstrate outside the Supreme Court on Monday, calling on Congress to give consideration to whomever President Obama nominates to replace Antonin Scalia. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images