Laos Laos

North Korean restaurants, like this one in Vientiane, Laos, are run by the North Korean government as a way to earn hard currency. North Korea and Laos have had good relations for many years, but South Korea is trying to make inroads as well. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Laos: A Remote Battleground For North And South Korea

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President Obama announced on Tuesday in Laos that the U.S. will provide additional assistance to help remove unexploded bombs dropped by the U.S. during the Vietnam War. "Given our history here, I believe the United States has a moral obligation to help Laos heal," Obama said. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Obama Pledges To Help 'Heal' Laos, Decades After U.S. Bombings

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North Korean restaurants, like this one in Vientiane, Laos, don't just serve North Korean cuisine. They are run by the North Korean government as a way to earn hard currency to send back to an increasingly sanctioned Pyongyang. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

A municipal worker sweeps along a pathway near the Mekong river, in the capital Vientiane, Laos. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

Tiny Laos Readies For A Visit From Obama — And A Turn Under The Global Spotlight

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Nearly everyone fishes for a living on Laos' Don Sadam Island, near the site of the controversial Don Sahang dam. Locals and environmentalists alike are worried about the dam's effects on fish migration. Michael Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan/NPR

Damming The Mekong River: Economic Boon Or Environmental Mistake?

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Former Hmong Gen. Vang Pao (right) in May 2000 during a wreath-laying ceremony at the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D.C. Luke Frazza /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Frazza /AFP/Getty Images