health care law repeal health care law repeal

Roughly 1.4 million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, and two-thirds are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal health care program for people with low incomes or disabilities. Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Blend Images/Getty Images

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., continues to tweak the health care bill he cosponsors in an effort to persuade reluctant senators to back it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Protesters rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol in June. Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering 74 million people — more than 1 in 5 Americans. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Affordable Care Act navigators helped guide those looking for insurance during an enrollment event at San Antonio's Southwest General Hospital last year. Beyond helping with initial enrollment, navigators often follow up with help later, as an applicant's income or job status changes. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (left) and Ohio Gov. John Kasich will present a plan that fleshes out a set of principles they wrote about in an op-ed in The Washington Post. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Trump still hopes to force legislators back to the table to find a way to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, by any means possible. Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images

Shifting messages from the U.S. Congress have left many would-be entrepreneurs, and workers who've recently been laid off, wondering how best to maintain health coverage. Michael Blann/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Blann/Getty Images

Corinne Bobbie says she is grateful that the Affordable Care Act guaranteed health insurance for her 8-year-old daughter, Sophia, who was born with a heart condition. But Corinne and her husband still can't afford coverage for the rest of the family. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Protected But Priced Out: Patients Worry About Health Law's Future In Arizona

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There are many reasons someone could end up having a lapse in health insurance. They might need to move closer to a caregiver or treatment center, for example, and consequently have to quit their job — and lose their insurance. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images/Getty Images

People attending Rep. Rod Blum's town hall event in Dubuque, Iowa, this week held up red sheets of paper to show disagreement with what the Republican congressman was saying and green to show they concurred. The GOP health care bill was a major concern of many. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Fact-Checking Republicans' Defense Of The GOP Health Bill

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House Speaker Paul Ryan (center) walks to the House chamber ahead of a budget vote on Capitol Hill. Though Ryan was able to deliver 217 votes Thursday to get his GOP health plan through the House, there are still significant hurdles before the bill becomes law. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

5 Things To Watch As GOP Health Bill Moves To The Senate

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Rep. Peter King, a Republican representing Long Island, has been heavily lobbied by groups on both sides of the GOP health care bill who are intent on getting him to vote their way. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

People who lacked health insurance for more than three consecutive months in 2016, or who bought individual insurance and got federal help paying the premiums, will need to do a little work to figure out what, if anything, they owe the IRS. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Tax Day And Health Insurance Under Trump

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