computers computers
Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: Do the Patterns in Your Past Predict Your Future?

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Owura Kwadwo Hottish illustrates a window of Microsoft Word using colored chalk on a blackboard. He uses it to teach computer skills to students at the Betenase M/A Junior High School in Kumasi, Ghana. Frimpong Innocent hide caption

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Frimpong Innocent

Computer Teacher With No Computers Chalks Up Clever Classroom Plan

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Sci-fi writer William Gibson says the best way to imagine new technologies and how they could affect society is not through current expertise but by talking to "either artists or criminals." Ron Bull/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Bull/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Artists And Criminals: On The Cutting Edge Of Tech

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Sam Rowe for NPR

Can Computers Learn Like Humans?

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After collecting and refurbishing IBM's Model F keyboards for years, Joe Strandberg decided he wanted to start manufacturing them. Courtesy of Joe Strandberg hide caption

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Courtesy of Joe Strandberg

This 10-Pound Keyboard From The 1980s Is Making A Comeback

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"I lost the first good novel I ever wrote to a computer disaster. It happened at a crucial time in my life, when I was still figuring out if I could even do this thing — become a writer." Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images

A Novelist Forces Himself To Press On After Losing 100 Pages In A Tech Glitch

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Cash machines in a supermarket in Kiev weren't working on Wednesday after a cyberattack paralyzed computers in Ukraine and elsewhere. Victims included government offices, energy companies, banks and gas stations. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Workers at the Department of Homeland Security's National Operations Center in 2015. The Obama administration proposes $3.1 billion in upgrades to federal computer systems. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
Annelise Capossela

Human Or Machine: Can You Tell Who Wrote These Poems?

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This 2005 silicon wafer with Pentium 4 processors was signed by Gordon Moore for the 40th anniversary of Moore’'s law. Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Dave Rauchwerk is CEO of Next Thing Co., which makes the CHIP computer. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Can A $9 Computer Spark A New Wave Of Tinkering And Innovation?

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