corruption corruption

Zhou Qiang, president of the Supreme People's Court of China, speaks to the National People's Congress in Beijing on March 12. Chinese authorities are waging a major campaign against corruption, and that includes a list of 100 suspects believed to be overseas. Many are former officials who are thought to have fled to the U.S. or Canada. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

When Corrupt Chinese Officials Flee, The U.S. Is A Top Destination

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People, most of them unemployed, line up March 19 at a popular Itaborai, Brazil, restaurant where they can have lunch for about 30 cents. The Petrobras refinery and processing plant on the outskirts of town has been shut down; tens of thousands are now out of work in the area. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

Huge Scandal At Top Of Petrobras Trickles Down, With Devastating Effect

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In this Aug. 14, 2013 file photo, former Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. and his wife, Sandra, arrive at federal court in Washington to learn their fates when a federal judge sentences the one-time power couple for misusing $750,000 in campaign money. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Former Virginia first lady Maureen McDonnell (left) arrives at federal court in Richmond, Va., with her son Bobby for her sentencing on corruption charges Friday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Pablo Cote holds a photo of his deceased father of the same name in July 2013 in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cote was kidnapped while driving back from the U.S. border to the east-central state of Tlaxcala. He was beaten to death, part of the mass killing of 193 bus passengers and other travelers by the Zetas. Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP hide caption

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Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP

A Somali man walks in front of a high-rise apartment building under construction in Mogadishu on Nov. 4. Somalia, along with North Korea, is seen as the most-corrupt country in the world, according to the Corruption Perception Index released today by Transparency International. Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP hide caption

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Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP

Aansoo Kohli is running a makeshift class in a cowshed for children who have no access to school. Abdul Sattar for NPR hide caption

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Abdul Sattar for NPR

In Pakistan, A Self-Styled Teacher Holds Class For 150 In A Cowshed

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Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi meet on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) meeting in Beijing on Friday. Beijing and Washington backed an anti-corruption pact. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

Groups of rural and community police arrive in the city of Iguala on Tuesday to help in the search for 43 students who disappeared after a confrontation with local police on Sept. 26. Miguel Tovar/STF/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Tovar/STF/LatinContent/Getty Images

43 Missing Students, 1 Missing Mayor: Of Crime And Collusion In Mexico

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Antonio Cavalcante had a candidate for governor successfully barred after proving he had embezzled millions of dollars while he was a state legislator. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR

How One Chauffeur Took Down A Corrupt Brazilian Politician

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