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It seems like every kid is online. But UNICEF's director of data, Laurence Chandy, observes: "It's a huge inequity between those who have access and those who do not." Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

Want your kid to succeed? Don't try that hard. sturti/Getty Images/Vetta hide caption

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sturti/Getty Images/Vetta

The Carpenter Vs. The Gardener: Two Models Of Modern Parenting

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A camp where more than 1,300 women and children, all foreign nationals and believed to be relatives of Islamic State militants, were kept on the outskirts of Mosul. They have been moved by Iraqi officials, to the concern of aid agencies. Balint Szlanko/AP hide caption

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Balint Szlanko/AP

Christine Garcia relaxes with her 8-year-old daughter Mia in the Channelview High School gym. It's been turned into an evacuation shelter for victims of flooding from Harvey. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Houston School Superintendent Says A Lot Of Work Ahead To Open Schools

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Not only are kids raising animals and learning the how-tos of vaccinations and record-keeping, 4-H'ers are also being taught how to add up the costs and weigh them against future profits. Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images

The YouTube Star Who's Teaching Kids How To Bake

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Jack Gilbert, co-author of the book "Dirt Is Good," says kids should be encouraged to get dirty, play with animals and eat colorful vegetables. Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF

'Dirt Is Good': Why Kids Need Exposure To Germs

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